M Britt Kemper Profiles

  • Bought the 2020 pack, great tones in there!

    I was comparing the 68 Marshall with the 69 Marshall from a few years ago,

    Same here. Still after a few days of playing around I have to admit the the 69 pack is unbeatable for my needs. To me it's just fuller sounding for all kinds of harder rock stuff. Often use it with a pure booster to create a bit more gain and a "browner" sound. So the 69 remains my go to pack for versatile rock sounds.


    Still the 2020 stuff is nicely developing Michael's stuff further. I like the 68 as well as the 800 quite a lot. Not so much the 72 as I find it a bit too loose and even more old school which is nice but I don't need this often.

  • I'm finding that I prefer the Marshall tones in the 2020 pack to the 69 pack, with a caveat. I use the Greenback cab from the 69 Marshall pack. It's an option I highly recommend trying, especially if you're like me and not a fan of the classic 80 for anything more than low gain.

  • I'm finding that I prefer the Marshall tones in the 2020 pack to the 69 pack, with a caveat. I use the Greenback cab from the 69 Marshall pack. It's an option I highly recommend trying, especially if you're like me and not a fan of the classic 80 for anything more than low gain.


    You mean that you “Copy” the “Cabinet” from the 69 and “Paste” it on the 68?

  • I'd love to hear some of the other Marshalls he's already profiled in the past get a new treatment with the Greenback and H30 4x12s that he has. I realize for his own live work, that's probably not the sound he's necessarily going for, but that's a Marshall pack I'd go buy from him for sure.


    I feel like when you take the IR of a Studio profile and move it to another, it's kind of like 70% one amp and 30% another. It's obvious when you try different profiles of the same amp and pull the cab over. Some part of that profile's gain/aggression bleeds into the cab IR, almost like a room mic, and feeds too much (for me) of that profile into the other. To me, a fully baked profile is the secret sauce of the Kemper vs the other methods.


    I'm OK with the 3P 2x12 and CL80 speaker. It's certainly more even and "mellow" in tone vs. others but the low end response is great for a 2x12 and it's blank slate-ish.

  • I'd love to hear some of the other Marshalls he's already profiled in the past get a new treatment with the Greenback and H30 4x12s that he has. I realize for his own live work, that's probably not the sound he's necessarily going for, but that's a Marshall pack I'd go buy from him for sure.


    I feel like when you take the IR of a Studio profile and move it to another, it's kind of like 70% one amp and 30% another. It's obvious when you try different profiles of the same amp and pull the cab over. Some part of that profile's gain/aggression bleeds into the cab IR, almost like a room mic, and feeds too much (for me) of that profile into the other. To me, a fully baked profile is the secret sauce of the Kemper vs the other methods.


    I'm OK with the 3P 2x12 and CL80 speaker. It's certainly more even and "mellow" in tone vs. others but the low end response is great for a 2x12 and it's blank slate-ish.

    I basically agree regarding swapping studio profile cabs around, but I've found that when switching between similar amps at similar gain levels, say cranked Marshall/Marshallesque, from the same profiler using the same mics/micing technique, say MBritt, that it works really well. MBritt's profiles are overall my favorites, but I almost always swap out his Classic 80 cab with either his 69 Marshall Greenback cab or his Wizard V30 cab. With moderate to high gain (4+ on the Kemper), I find the Classic 80 too smooth in the mids and scratchy/papery in the highs.

  • I agree with swapping the cab. I am using the 30w Greenback from the 69 Marshall pack(profile H4T to be exact) and I think it makes a lot of the other profiles much nicer for my tastes. I just tried it with the Soldano from the Crank n Go pack and it works really well on the studio profiles. I seem to find that swapping a studio profile cab onto other studio profiles works well, but studio cab onto merged not so well. I guess it just depends how the algorithm works for separating the amp and cab on a studio profile.


    It would be great to have these other options in packs, rather than just the CL80. A few different merged profiles would take care of that as well.

  • I've been using the 69 Greenback cab with other profiles, it often makes them sounding great, but I notice that they all end up sounding very similar to the 69 Marshall profile the cab is borrowed from.

    Is that normal, that the cab is so dominant that imparts 90% of the final sound, or I am doing something wrong?

  • I've been using the 69 Greenback cab with other profiles, it often makes them sounding great, but I notice that they all end up sounding very similar to the 69 Marshall profile the cab is borrowed from.

    Is that normal, that the cab is so dominant that imparts 90% of the final sound, or I am doing something wrong?

    While some of this is due the Kemper not being 100% accurate separating cabs from amps in studio profiles, the cabinet/speakers (and mics) account for a significant portion of the tone. Here's just one example from the "real world" of the importance of cab/speaker where Marshall and Fender amps are switched between Marshall and Fender cabs https://youtu.be/7-st0iUbEFg

  • I've been using the 69 Greenback cab with other profiles, it often makes them sounding great, but I notice that they all end up sounding very similar to the 69 Marshall profile the cab is borrowed from.

    Is that normal, that the cab is so dominant that imparts 90% of the final sound, or I am doing something wrong?

    The cab, to me, is a the tonal fingerprint. The amp portion is more about the gain level and some eq balance levels, but the cab plays a large part in the overall tone. I like to save a few of my favorite rigs' cabs as presets and then use those if I encounter a rig that I don't particularly care for and swap them out. I try my handful of saved cabs and if I still don't like it, I usually take that rig out of my Kemper. I kinda like that the cab separation algorithm isn't "perfect" because even though I use a few of the same actual speaker cabs for most everything, I get very different CAB results because of the different amps being profiled. Even profiles using the same exact cab/speaker can yield varying Cab results which just gives me more options when looking for tones later.

  • lonestargtr Have you tried the Kone imprints with the Valvetrain? If so, what do you think?

    Soooo.... I had tried the Kone imprints briefly with my Celestion coax (similar to Kemper Kone) and just really didn't like it but I think it was the coax speaker I didn't like. But today, after reading this, I thought I'd try out the Kone imprints into the Valvetrain. I was very prepared to not like the results as I'm just accustomed to what I normally hear. But I have to say that I'm pleasantly surprised. Even though the Valvetrain uses a guitar speaker, the amp is voiced to work with the speaker in a way that makes it close enough to flat response that the imprints really work pretty much as intended. Without the Kone imprints, there is a bit of low mid bump and rolled off highs that I get used to and that kind of go away at higher volumes with the Valvetrain. With the Kone imprints, it sounds a little like a layer is removed and it sounds and feels a bit more like an amp in the room, especially at the volume I use in my office. Now, of course, it's a can of worms to decide which imprint I like best with each profile, but all in all, I think it's a great added feature and I can definitely see myself using the Kone imprints at home and maybe even on the road (if going on the road ever exists again). Thanks for the comment and setting me off down this road!

  • Soooo.... I had tried the Kone imprints briefly with my Celestion coax (similar to Kemper Kone) and just really didn't like it but I think it was the coax speaker I didn't like. But today, after reading this, I thought I'd try out the Kone imprints into the Valvetrain. I was very prepared to not like the results as I'm just accustomed to what I normally hear. But I have to say that I'm pleasantly surprised. Even though the Valvetrain uses a guitar speaker, the amp is voiced to work with the speak in a way that makes it close enough to flat response that the imprints really work pretty much as intended. Without the Kone imprints, there is a bit of low mid bump and rolled off highs that I get used to and that kind of go away at higher volumes with the Valvetrain. With the Kone imprints, it sounds a little like a layer is removed and it sounds and feels a bit more like an amp in the room, especially at the volume I use in my office. Now, of course, it's a can of worms to decide which imprint I like best with each profile, but all in all, I think it's a great added feature and I can definitely see myself using the Kone imprints at home and maybe even on the road (if going on the road ever exists again). Thanks for the comment and setting me off down this road!

    Thanks Michael, and you're welcome.

    I was curious because I get some positive results using your XiTone model. That said the Kone in the Kabinet is better for sure, probably because of the coax you mention.

    When I get back into our practice studio I'll be trying it on my DXR10 and Bose L1 MII as well.

    You're right about the can of worms applying imprints to rigs. I think I need to re-do my performances but the good/bad news is that I have the time to do it.

    Funny how I got used to the lack of AITR in favour of tonal bliss, and now I get to have that back too. Great time to be a guitar player (apart from the obvious stick in the bicycle spokes of life).:)

    Thanks again for your testing, I sincerely appreciate it!

  • The cab, to me, is a the tonal fingerprint. The amp portion is more about the gain level and some eq balance levels, but the cab plays a large part in the overall tone. I like to save a few of my favorite rigs' cabs as presets and then use those if I encounter a rig that I don't particularly care for and swap them out. I try my handful of saved cabs and if I still don't like it, I usually take that rig out of my Kemper. I kinda like that the cab separation algorithm isn't "perfect" because even though I use a few of the same actual speaker cabs for most everything, I get very different CAB results because of the different amps being profiled. Even profiles using the same exact cab/speaker can yield varying Cab results which just gives me more options when looking for tones later.

    I have to ask, I think your switchback 212 is wonderfully balanced, but having bought the pack, I liked the cab on the OD100 a ton, ¿what are the specs? is it a 2x12? It sounds wonderful with the 69 Marshall (wonderful cleans, never expected that, then I saw it was from Eric Johnson, and it clicked, love it clean, love it overdrived, stock cab and with others), cab mix and matching gives another dimension to this.


    My other question regarding this, I am hesitant to buy your IR packs exactly for those reasons, I do not know how much will be lost from the amp taking out the cab and putting one from an IR conversion. Maybe some magic is lost there. Is it better with the kemper cab pack? I wonder how much do you consider it would be lost, I am in the search for some immaculate 4x12 greenback cab sound with fatthead and a royer mic (gives a very realistic full expectrum of what you may hear in the room in my experience).

  • I have to ask, I think your switchback 212 is wonderfully balanced, but having bought the pack, I liked the cab on the OD100 a ton, ¿what are the specs? is it a 2x12? It sounds wonderful with the 69 Marshall (wonderful cleans, never expected that, then I saw it was from Eric Johnson, and it clicked, love it clean, love it overdrived, stock cab and with others), cab mix and matching gives another dimension to this.


    My other question regarding this, I am hesitant to buy your IR packs exactly for those reasons, I do not know how much will be lost from the amp taking out the cab and putting one from an IR conversion. Maybe some magic is lost there. Is it better with the kemper cab pack? I wonder how much do you consider it would be lost, I am in the search for some immaculate 4x12 greenback cab sound with fatthead and a royer mic (gives a very realistic full expectrum of what you may hear in the room in my experience).

    I have 2 different 3P cabs I profile with, a 212 Switchback and a 112 Switchback. They do have slightly different tones. In general, I tend to use the 212 with higher wattage amps, but I do profile other amps with it as well if it's already set up. I use the 112 for lower wattage amps as a rule, but again, if it's already set up and ready to go I'll start with it. Like I said before, I've profiled those same cabs hundreds of times and each Kemper CAB I get from it is slightly different depending on the amp being profiled. Every now and then I get a CAB that works on lots of other stuff. I have a handful that I keep saved as presets and if I come to a rig that I don't like a whole lot tonally, I'll swap cabs to one of my faves to see if it sounds better to me. It just increases my chances of liking a rig. Slight changes in mic position from setup to setup or changes made on purpose... these all have impacts on the finished cab sound, along with humidity, actual mics being used, Chinese Zodiac year, etc.


    As far as the IR pack goes, I am not sure how necessary it is. I would treat it like the saved CAB presets, in that it just gives extra options for rigs that you may not like as is. After all of these years and having made them, I tend not to use them much. I just usually either prefer the profiled CABS or my saved CABS. I just try to limit my options a bit so I can get work done without disappearing down another rabbit hole.

  • I stumbled onto something may be useful to others.

    Using a rig from the 2020 pack, ( I was working with the 3P AD Black 3), copy the compressor into slot A, and copy the screamer into slot B, leaving the screamer in slot C. Just by doing that, this rig can cover a LOT of ground. With the screamers off, there is a great clean to slightly dirty tone that feels great. Add one screamer and turn the guitar volume down slightly for a crunch sound. Turn the guitar volume up for a more saturated crunch sound. Engage both screamers for a clear, singing lead tone.