How often do you set PRE amplifier equalizer?

  • I noticed that the pre has a more subtle effect in comparison.


    Of course, because mainly the distortion characteristics change, not the overall tone. It's pre-stack.


    I think the behaviour is a bit different than a real amp equalizer though.


    ... which depends upon if the real amp EQ is pre- stack, like in Fender amps, or post, like in most Marshalls.

  • Putting an EQ before the gainstages has a similar effect as changing pickups. Using a slight highpass EQ can give you the same result as using a tubescreamer, but with more flexibility. It´s a nice thing to do if you want a tighter rhythm tone. Boosting the treble results in a more biting distortion without pumping the output level too high. This can give you similar results as using an EMG81.

  • It's one stage of profiling that should really be made mandatory, picking where the EQ should go as it makes a big difference to how close to the original amp the controls will be. With some fender amps and most Mesa amps it needs to be in the pre position in order for the controls to mimics the amps controls.

  • Nearly always I use an EQ pre to the KPA, but not the KPA-internal EQ's. I use physical EQ-pedals or the Axe FX-internal EQs. Post EQs I use from the console or from DAW-Plugins.
    Imo the KPA internal FX are the weakest side of the machine, good usable for quick and dirty settings but not for recordings/studio use. I usually first turn the FX-blocks of the KPA off when testing a new profile. Every profile has to stand this test before becoming part of my collection.

  • Nearly always I use an EQ pre to the KPA, but not the KPA-internal EQ's. I use physical EQ-pedals or the Axe FX-internal EQs. Post EQs I use from the console or from DAW-Plugins.
    Imo the KPA internal FX are the weakest side of the machine, good usable for quick and dirty settings but not for recordings/studio use. I usually first turn the FX-blocks of the KPA off when testing a new profile. Every profile has to stand this test before becoming part of my collection.


    They're talking about the Amp EQ rather than a stomp (Press and hold the EQ button in the stack section and you can adjust the position of the EQ within the stack to Pre or Post from the settings there).


    Personally I find the FX in the Kemper perfectly useable, if limited in range and routing.

  • It's one stage of profiling that should really be made mandatory, picking where the EQ should go as it makes a big difference to how close to the original amp the controls will be. With some fender amps and most Mesa amps it needs to be in the pre position in order for the controls to mimics the amps controls.


    The Kemper front panel EQ parameters are not affected by the profiling process. They are pre-set with musically useful values.


    If you want to make a Rig from a Profile, putting the Kemper EQ pre- or post- amp may get you closer to the response of the original controls, but will not reproduce their behavior.

  • Whenever I audition a new profile I turn off all the stomp EQ's and see if I can get something I like with just the front panel EQ's. If not I just move on. There's tons of profiles out there so why waste a stomp? At least for me I haven't found one I can't live without. I play mostly live and too many things would get in the way of that perfect tone anyways.

  • The Kemper front panel EQ parameters are not affected by the profiling process. They are pre-set with musically useful values.


    If you want to make a Rig from a Profile, putting the Kemper EQ pre- or post- amp may get you closer to the response of the original controls, but will not reproduce their behavior.


    Actually they're set where you last left on the last loaded rig before profiling. You can modify their default values during profiling, at that setting the EQ will be "neutral" to the original sound, it's basically arbitrary.


    However perhaps I wasn't clear. The placement of the EQ in the stack has a dramatic difference in the behavior of the controls. One way matches the behavior of e.g. a Marshall, the other matches the behavior of e.g. a Mesa. Yes it wont match the exact throw or taper of the pots on the amp (no-one could expect that with only a single profile at a single position), but it will match the behavior much moire closely allowing you to treat the profile much as you would the real amp.


    So all I was really trying to get at was that as it appears a lot of people aren't even aware of the ability then it follows most people aren't touching this setting and subsequently they're making profiles that aren't as versatile or close to the original amps as they could be. Which just perpetuates the myth that a profile is a simple snapshot of an amp with a slap of EQ on top which shouldn't be tinkered with (which is silly) if you want to remain true to the original source. Yes the Kemper throw's a lot further than the controls on the real amp, but if the profile is set up correctly from the get go then you can utilize the profile controls just like the real amp (within reason) and remain reasonably close to source, if it isn't set up correctly then it could still be a great profile but it will be much less like the original amp when tweaked. That may or may not be that important to the creator or the user, but it's IMO important enough that it should be highlighted or presented as an option during profiling.