Be careful with the amp / company names

  • I know. I've been doing that as I go along since the beginning, but it's such a pain. It often takes longer researching what the actual amp is, than to change the tags.


    The helpful ones say trying to recreate the sound of 'whatever' amp. Those vendors seem to think it's safe enough, but I suppose it's down to the individual vendor as to how many threats they've had or how they feel about it.

    Exactly, Rod.


    So many DuckDuckGo searches for real amp and model names, and then there're the bass-preamp / modelling pedals and so on. Is it a DI pedal? Is it a modeller? Does it include a cab sim or can it be categorised as a DI technically?


    It goes on and on. Been doing this for months now and I'm nowhere-near finished. :rolleyes:

  • Exactly, Rod.


    So many DuckDuckGo searches for real amp and model names, and then there're the bass-preamp / modelling pedals and so on. Is it a DI pedal? Is it a modeller? Does it include a cab sim or can it be categorised as a DI technically?


    It goes on and on. Been doing this for months now and I'm nowhere-near finished. :rolleyes:

    Do the makers of profiles respond to questions about the amps, etc. used in making their stuff, or does that put them at risk as well?

  • Indeed, Chris, and therein lies the trap those peeps employ, of course.


    If a lawyer could be employed on a NWNF basis, that'd solve the problem...

    The irony is that amp manufacturers probably feel like profile creators are making money by piggy backing on their hard work and investment. And yet, most of the modded-M style amps out there are making money by piggy backing on Jim Marshall's hard work and investment. Marshall, of course, piggy backed on Leo Fender's design. And I doubt seriously that Leo sat in a clean room environment and came up with his amp designs in a vacuum.


    Kinda hard to draw an ethical line in the sand on this stuff. Of course, none of that changes the legal realities.

  • Do the makers of profiles respond to questions about the amps, etc. used in making their stuff, or does that put them at risk as well?

    I've seen them respond in threads, Chris, but given all this paranoia stuff, I'd suggest asking via PM if one's concerned about "exposing" them.


    There's a distinct feeling of walking on eggshells about this stuff, and I don't like it. Yet another manifestation of the PC world we now live in... I mean, have to endure... :rolleyes: Somebody's feelings are gonna be hurt somewhere by most of what we say and do...

  • I don't believe there is any clear statute or case-law prohibiting saying "This profile was designed to replicate the sounds of Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier", maybe it'd be even safer to say "was created using amp X", I don't know, but as Chris says, this works until you get sued. I think language like "attempting to recreate the tone of a amp X" might be best, as "tone" is not protected under trademark or copyright law...but no one wants to be the first to find out the hard way.


    It is a shame to see people too scared by a cease-and-desist letter, the lawyers I know call them "laugh-and-persist-letters", as they are pretty impotent, and most companies with money only send them because they don't have grounds for an actual suit. Maybe this isn't as much the case as I've been lead to believe...


    IP law needs a little re-working for the digital age.

    Disclaimer: When I post demo clips for profiles, there will be some minimal post-processing, unless stated otherwise. I normally double-track hard L/R, and add to the main buss a small amount of EQ and a limiter/comp set pretty light as well. Sometimes I get test profiles in advance of release, though 90% of my clips will be from packs I have purchased.

  • I think some of these amp manufacturers need to get with the real world these days. They are not losing any business from me because I have no intention of buying any amps anymore, not because I have a kemper, but because even the small ones are far too loud.


    I've had bought all sorts of amps in the past JCM800, Peavey Triumph, Fender Twin, JC120, Musicman etc. and it was rarely the case where I could use their potential even at gigs. Really in those days that's all there was, and Master Volumes where a great help but didn't solve the problem. If I could have, I would have used a kemper from the start in the '70s. It's the first time I've been able to get the right sound at the right volume.

    Sterling Musicman JP150, Fender USA Strat
    Kemper Powerhead & Remote > ElectroVoice ZLX12-P | Palmer 1x12 Cab(G12M) | Sennheiser HD558
    Audient iD14 > Reaper