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  • RGD (Replacement Guitar Day)

    Okay, the replacement from Musicians Friend arrived. Here are the photos. The fret dressing on this one is awesome. The last one looked like they never even dressed the ends of the frets. They were beveled, but none of the edges were rounded. Kind of like they completely missed a step! This one has nice rounded fret ends, and polished. No fret sprout.


    The other one had a bowed back neck, which was fixed with loosening the Truss Rod. This one is completely flat, with no relief. Easy fix, but will let it aclemate for a few days before adjusting. Intonation was way out on both, but again, just normal setup.

    Hopefully I won't find any reason to return this. I freakin' love the neck on this thing.


    To those who said I was being too picky, maybe so, but I knew this is the way a new $1k guitar should be. I still have both here right now. Will get the other one shipped back soon.



  • Funny you say that, I have got my eye on a PRS Silver Sky.....

    Got the Orian Green Silver Sky. Incredible tone.

    '19 Relish Eucalypt Mary | '17 PRS McCarty 594 | '15 PRS 408 | '96 PRS Custom 22 | '78 Les Paul Custom | '19 Silver Sky

    Kemper Toaster | Rack | Remote

    Friedman ASM-12 | Atomic CLR Neo Mk II Wedge | ValveTrain Powertrain Studio 20

  • Hi all, This is not my main player but a favorite one I built. The story is that I used to work on the development of the Boeing KC-45A Pegasus USAF Tanker. The airplane is awesome and I decided to use it as inspiration for a guitar build. The KC-46 went through more than its share of development challenges (still has some struggles) but it’s still a game changer compared to the 1950s era tankers still in use. One of the main struggles was with the massive amount of wiring in the plane. So, I built a tribute guitar with rather involved wiring design. I incorporate a 6 position toggle that allows me to select any combination of the 3 humbuckers. Also all 4 pots are push-pull which all each HB to be split. It took longer than expected (about 4 months) and cost more than expected, just like the real thing. I got it a pro setup once finished and it plays and sounds great. I even got the Chief pilot to give it a ride (see photo of the guitar Pegasus in a Pegasus while following close behind another Pegasus. The back is signed by about 15 top company, government and military leaders. Here are the specs:


    Basswood body. Maple neck with rosewood fretboard. Bone nut.

    Pickups:

    Neck – Seymour Duncan Saturday Night Special Neck – SD Nickel Cover, Gibson Black Neck Ring

    Middle - Seymour Duncan Pearly Gates Neck – SD Nickel Cover, Gibson Black Neck Ring

    Bridge – Seymour Duncan Saturday Night Special Bridge – SD Nickel Cover, Gibson Black Bridge Ring

    Tuners: Sperzel 3+3 Locking Tuning Machines – Nickel finish

    Strap locks: Schaller Guitar Strap Locks – Nickel finish

    Potentiometers: 4 DiMarzio 500K Push-Pull Pots – Gibson black top-hat knobs

    Stop bar: Gibson – Nickel finish

    Bridge: Graph Tech RESOMAX NV2 Harmonic Bridge Nickel 6mm posts String Saver Saddles

    Toggle: Free Way 6-way switch – Nickel and black

    Position

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    Pickups

    N

    B+N

    B

    N+M

    M

    B+M

    Output jack: Switchcraft with Gibson jack plate – Nickel finish

    Tone Pot Capacitor: 0.022uF Orange Drop

    Electronics:

    Neck volume – pull to split neck pickup

    Middle volume – pull to split middle pickup

    Bridge volume – pull to split bridge pickup

    Master tone – Push-pull for position 5 only (Pull to activate all 3 pickups. Push for middle only)

    Finish:

    Body – ColorTone metallic #3893 Silver lacquer body front and front of headstock.

    ColorTone Black Aerosol Guitar Lacquer body back, sides, neck and back of headstock
    ColorTone Black lacquer Pegasus airbrush graphics and lettering.

    Clear coat: Behlen Nitrocellulose Stringed Instrument Lacquer.

    Weight 9lb 0.6oz


  • So, I built a tribute guitar with rather involved wiring design. I incorporate a 6 position toggle that allows me to select any combination of the 3 humbuckers. Also all 4 pots are push-pull which all each HB to be split. It took longer than expected (about 4 months) and cost more than expected, just like the real thing. I got it a pro setup once finished and it plays and sounds great.

    Superb man, just superb.


    All-class. 8)

  • how is maple fretboards on jazzmasters? They usually come with rosewood

    These were the only Jazzmasters that were released with maple fretboards (from what I know) yes. It has a very "stratty" feel & tone to it. It seems that there are many who praise Fender for these Jazzmasters, but they aren't very popular among traditionalists (maple fretboard, strat-"like" single coils and no dual wiring system). I'm loving it, but I have an alternative taste in general.

  • These were the only Jazzmasters that were released with maple fretboards (from what I know) yes. It has a very "stratty" feel & tone to it. It seems that there are many who praise Fender for these Jazzmasters, but they aren't very popular among traditionalists (maple fretboard, strat-"like" single coils and no dual wiring system). I'm loving it, but I have an alternative taste in general.

    I've always wondered what Jazzmasters bring to the party that's different in the Fender camp.


    I've played Strats for decades and only recently added a Tele as they were so close to Strats that I often wondered what the point would be to having both. And if money had been more of an issue, I'd still be fine with just the Strat. The Tele is brighter and has slightly more body. Still twanky as hell though, so instantly recognizable for that "Fender" sound.


    What are the characteristics that would make me reach for a Jazzmaster rather than the Strat or Tele?


    Hi all, This is not my main player but a favorite one I built.

    Say, shouldn't you put that guitar down and pay attention to driving before you bump into one of those other planes? :)


    (and very cool guitar)

  • I've always wondered what Jazzmasters bring to the


    What are the characteristics that would make me reach for a Jazzmaster rather than the Strat or Tele?

    Say your playing your strat, and your thinking "my strings aren't falling off the saddles often enough", then maybe you need a Jazzmaster.


    I always wanted one 'til I played one, they do look cool though. Maybe if you dont hit the strings hard you'll be fine, otherwise I've heard of people running a string retainer behind the bridge, whatever suits your playing style I suppose

  • Say your playing your strat, and your thinking "my strings aren't falling off the saddles often enough", then maybe you need a Jazzmaster.


    I always wanted one 'til I played one, they do look cool though. Maybe if you dont hit the strings hard you'll be fine, otherwise I've heard of people running a string retainer behind the bridge, whatever suits your playing style I suppose

    The jazzmasters do have issues with the strings slipping out of the saddles. The saddles on these models are more reliable Mustang type saddles, still not strat-reliable. I also own a standard strat, which is my go-to, but the JM brings its own mojo to the table.

  • Shhhh. The company's got enough problems right now. Thanks!

  • Been wanting one of these for years. Picked it up recently. Perhaps not what you'd expect to find among Kemper owners. Playing this is doing wonders for my technique. One of the last ones made (Aug 2005).

  • I got the Gibson Chet Atkins CEC


    Nylon String Thinbody Cutaway with Spruce Top in Antique Natural Finish and Ebony Fingerboard with 2" Nut


    https://web.archive.org/web/20…/Signature/chetcecec.html

    https://web.archive.org/web/20…gnature/Chetdatasheet.pdf



    Gibson introduced the Chet Atkins CE and CEC nylon string guitars in 1981, and they proved popular because they allowed for feedback-free playing at amplified stage volumes. These guitars are heavier than one might expect, but that is on purpose. The lack of a large resonating chamber and the added weight of the mostly solid body design helps to defeat feedback, especially on a nylon string guitar used for amplified performance.


    Produced from 1981 to 2005, the Gibson Chet Atkins CE and CEC models are nearly identical, with the primary differences being the fingerboard material (rosewood or ebony 2") and the nut width. The bodies are made from solid mahogany and feature sound chambers to reduce weight and to make the sound more acoustic. The tops are solid spruce or cedar. The necks are mahogany with a neck joint location at the 12th fret – like a classical guitar, and the scale is 25 1/2″. And they feature a multi-element piezo bridge pickup with a battery-powered preamp that balances the output. The instrument featured here has three controls: Volume, Treble and Bass. Additionally, one can actually adjust the output for each string individually by adjusting one of the six trim pots located inside the control cavity!





  • Another RGD (replacement guitar day) here.


    I was totally bummed out when that Ran Crusher I bought turned out to be damaged. I have also been looking to offload my Mayones six string, because I found I was no longer bonding with it even though it was a great guitar.


    So all of a sudden, I was hit with a deluge of high end trades for the Mayones, including a Blackmachine B6 and an Overload Themis.


    Today, I finalised a deal for this baby.



    It's an OD Guitars Venus. Made in Israel. One of the most beautiful axes I've had the privilege of owning.


    It's a monster, superb construction and sounds crushing. Just sick, sick, sick!


    Very happy, though I guess everybody is on NGD (RGD)!