Into the void aka You moron, you traded away the Kemper

  • I traded away my Kemper today. I mean, I haven't traded it away yet, that happens on Monday. <X


    But while I thought I'd be having second thoughts, I'm actually looking forward to parting ways with it for a short time.


    Why? I have no idea... Grass is always greener on the other side? I've seen too many users do the same thing and come back a short while later.


    And in that regard, I've already plotted a return to the Kemper fold in the near future. I've never had such good tones as I've had out of this box, never sounded as good.


    But one thing I've always found lacking in my three year Kemper journey has been the fact that not once during that time did I delve into the profiling side of things.


    Heck, I've never owned a "real" amp in my life, I've always been fooling with Zooms and Bosses. Heck, the only guitar amp I've owned was a Marshall MG50DFX.


    As such, while I've always enjoyed my Kemper, I've lived a fairly sheltered existence. I know how good it gets, how bad can it get on the other side? :rolleyes:


    You know what I mean: kneeling in front of an amp in my cramped room as I mic it up at ridiculous volumes after recording a DI signal the wrong way that will later a merit a re-recording, but nevertheless I am sending it through a reamp box (for which I will have to spend more money) and then capturing that signal badly so that my final recording sounds like mush.


    I keep thinking it'll be effin' glorious. But most likely I'll be paying more money to Kemper GmBH, maybe for a rack next time.


    At the same time, I know that guys like @sinmix and @Dimi84 prefer to use real amps for recording. Do I have mad skills like them? Hell no, as mentioned, I have never owned a good amp in my life.


    But I do own an SM58, just need to pop the top off that sucker... I really am looking forward to learning something new.


    I'm also going to learn a bit more about things like IRs, since I plan to do most of the tracking using a load box with the amps. For the actual tones, I'll mic up the cabs.


    It's suicide, I know. Give up the Kemper and go back to the stone age?


    The one thing that scares me the most is that my recording projects will suffer.


    On the plus side, I'm getting two amps that I fell in love with after trying them on the Profiler. A Mesa Boogie Mark V and an EVH 5150 III. These are the dinky versions, but I believe that the tone is largely accurate. :thumbup:


    I also got a reactive load box in the deal, something made by Suhr. These aren't really high powered monsters and that Suhr Reactive load should allow me to play at low volume through my computer.


    That should keep me comfortable during tracking at least till I can pony up and get a nice cab. I'm assuming a 1x12 won't cut it. What do I need? A 2x10? 4x12?


    I know, I know, I could probably get better profiles than that on the Profiler! :thumbsup:


    Given that I'll probably have to pick up another Kemper down the line, I'm in two minds about this "deal". I think it would be really cool to get to explore these amps though.


    What do you say, yay or nay?


    Heck, I wonder if I'm going to lose my rights to post in the private forum once I hand over my serial number to the other guy ;(

  • You will lose your rights to the private forum if the other dude registers the serial, AJ.


    Amps are fun. I ended up with a Marshall JMP all-original 2x12 combo from 1978 after swapping my Power Rack for an Helix and then the Marshall. I still have my toaster however and turn on the Kemper more times than any of my amps with a ratio of about 50:1. Recording with an amp and getting a usable tone is time consuming in the best environments at the best of times; I don't dare try to imagine how it'll be in a home setting! However, you certainly will learn a thing or two about mics and mic placement. So, good luck! I dare say you're getting the best deal of the two of you, and the Kemper will still be available once you've had your fill of blown tubes, haha!

  • You will lose your rights to the private forum of the other dude registers the serial, AJ.


    Amps are fun. I ended up with a Marshall JMP all-original 2x12 combo from 1978 after swapping my Power Rack for an Helix and then the Marshall. I still have my toaster however and turn on the Kemper more times than any of my amps with a ratio of about 50:1. Recording with an amp and getting a usable tone is time consuming in the best environments at the best of times; I don't dare try to imagine how it'll be in a home setting! However, you certainly will learn a thing or two about mics and mic placement. So, good luck! I dare say you're getting the best deal of the two of you, and the Kemper will still be available once you've had your fill of blown tubes, haha!

    Hey man, did you ever get around to profiling that thing? :-)


    @nightlight, as has been said - whatever floats your boat :-) I think you'll come back to the kemper with a new perspective, and as such it's not a bad idea :-)

  • Have fun, AJ.


    I fear your grass-is-greener whim will cost you time and disappointment as you battle the boxiness / room-mode demons and so on. I mean, won't the prospect of having access to hundreds of amps via the Kemper be much-greener grass than being stuck with just 2, neither of which I'm betting you'll be able to record any better than you might've been able to using the literally thousands of Profiles available for those two amps alone?


    Sorry if I sound cynical; let me know when you're back if you see this response the same way it sounds right now, mate, and good luck! You'll be missed, bro'.

  • Yep, good luck and I respect your enthusiasm on trying a new endeavor. Always enjoyed your point of view on things and will look for it again in the near future. Best wishes on your new journey into amp / mic land!!

  • I think I get it. Simplify your choices. Sometimes you feel you have to strip things back to find yourself again. And you will ... and maybe that leads you back to the Kemper and maybe it doesn't. For a musician the best advice is: play it like you feel it.


    Best of luck.

  • I really am looking forward to learning something new.

    This! And Good luck! :thumbup:


    1. Good 2x12 cabs with V30 inside. (Probably Recto 2x12 is a best option - but old ones search with 70W v30)
    2. sm57/sm58
    3. Reampbox (yes, becouse then you can compare some good played and recorded DI from many guitarist) ALso best way to find good tone IMO. This one works good: https://www.thomann.de/de/palmer_reamping_boxdaccapo.htm
    4. Ahhh and Amp + boost :D


    Stay Metal!

  • I'm just heading the other way. I've got my dream tube amp and effects, but I'm personally over all of the extra effort it takes and the random results (and excessive stage volume) when gigging. Nice problems to have! Enjoy the ride!

  • @nightlight from the other side... If You want just record some projects at home IMO now even Ampsims sounds very good (as always the key is good IR from good sounding cab)


    1. DI reamped by Me with real Satan and recto 2x12/sm57
    2. Iv made IR from miced cab same pos what in reamping
    3. Free Solar (Satan ampsim and this |IR)
    4. Done!



    Stay Metal!

  • Good luck. Recording with an amp is tricky. You'll need some power load most probably and a good preamp. And mikes. And no traffic spoiling the recording. And.. I wont be a spoilsport; it's tricky and also a great experience. You'll be back even if you keep the amps. Got an Engl asleep all day. :D

  • 3. Reampbox (yes, becouse then you can compare some good played and recorded DI from many guitarist)

    100% agree, playing style and guitar setup are just as important as amp,mic,eq,etc.


    You're going to realize amp,cab and mic do not make up 100% of the tone. For me what matters most is guitar setup and playing style.


    Just look at Chappers and The Captain. Rob makes even shitty gear sound awesome. The Captain makes the most expensive gear sound like shit. Theres no easy way out.


    I've been spending tons of time working on my guitar setup. This has a huge impact on the tone. Tiny adjustments here and there. Recording every change and hearing the slight differences in tone. It adds up and I've done the same with adjusting my picking style.