I heard a rumor about a new Kemper Reverb that compete BIG SKY or IMMERSE type of reverb

  • You can put the (already released) Spring Reverb in any slot. I don’t know for sure but I’d be amazed if they prevented this in other reverbs that are coming. I am using the spring before the amp block and really like it for certain sounds -they’ve done a really good job with it IMO.

    I'm actually interested (nothing critical, it's completely in the "nice to have" category) in having the X slot at the end so I can use an external looper and skip all (mostly delay and reverb actually...) built-in effects. RC-30 has a crappy but somewhat usable metronome/drum function and an aux input for backing tracks.

  • I sold my BigSky and Timeline and got an old Lexicon PCM80. So I’m well taken care of in the reverb department. But if by chance these new reverbs are released before I order my Kemper, I wouldn’t mind one bit (my Lexicon might though).

  • So ever since I bought the Big Sky and Timeline, I'm not checking back here every day. It's like I'm okay for a while now. So I guess it wasn't all for naught :D

    I got my KPA the day before they announced the new reverbs. I tried to hold out, but 2 weeks ago broke down because i was tempted by a crazy deal on a Source Audio Ventris. The Ventris is dynamite and has exceeded expectations, but i still check back here every day:) For me the KPA has been an inspiration box, and while i've still only scratched the surface, I think the new reverbs are going to take it to another level!

  • Am I the only one who thinks the reverbs already in the box are great? I certainly don't need another pedal for reverb duties. And I play primarily atmospheric rock which is delay and reverb heavy. That said, it'll be nice to have some new reverb toys to play with when they arrive.

  • As a Post rock guitarist, I need those reverbs so much. Getting rid of my time factor and big sky. Relying only on the kemper is also a great deal for me !

    I really hope this is going to be released before the end of the year.

    I'm intrigued to find out what it is you're missing from what's already there? Not saying you're wrong, just interested. I think everyone is chomping at the bit to try these new algorithms out :-)

  • I sold my BigSky and Timeline and got an old Lexicon PCM80. So I’m well taken care of in the reverb department. But if by chance these new reverbs are released before I order my Kemper, I wouldn’t mind one bit (my Lexicon might though).

    Could you talk a little bit more about how that experience has been? I am curious about the PCM80 (and other Lexicon for that matter) but I don't know how the UI works, not sure if it's so different and difficult I'll hate it. Also very curious about specific experiences you've had with your new device, like did some reverbs sound way better than the pedals, or were there any reverbs that werent very good but you don't use them anyway? etc etc. If you would be so kind? :)

  • Could you talk a little bit more about how that experience has been? I am curious about the PCM80 (and other Lexicon for that matter) but I don't know how the UI works, not sure if it's so different and difficult I'll hate it. Also very curious about specific experiences you've had with your new device, like did some reverbs sound way better than the pedals, or were there any reverbs that werent very good but you don't use them anyway? etc etc. If you would be so kind? :)

    Sure thing. It’s important to remember that my PCM80 is from 1995. Limited display size and resolution, and certainly before computer editors. So all effect parameters are adjusted with the UP and DOWN buttons, and SELECT and ADJUST knobs. So, not the pinnacle of UI/UX. Coming from todays modern interfaces, you need to be really motivated to deep dive into these algorithms from the front panel. If, for instance, you think menu diving in the Strymon units is a bit much, you won’t like these.


    That being said, the PCM80/81 is far from limited in effects. It can flex. The M and PCM series Lexicon algorithms are legendary for a reason. The power in these algorithms is what seperates it from pedals like the Strymon’s, etc. Not just the complexity of them, but that they are openly exposed and configurable. For instance, take a given BigSky or Timeline mode. There’s an algorithm behind it, but only a handful of parameters are exposed for you to control, the rest are fixed behind the scenes. And the parameters can’t really talk to either other, like controlling multiple feedback paths with LFOs, etc. I don’t want to nerd-out too much here, but if you’re really curious, download the PCM80 manual and check out the Algorithms chapter. :huh:


    The simplest way I can describe it is this: the PCM80 gives you the ingredients to make whatever meal you want from it. Pedals give you a ready-made meal. If all you want is that meal and you don’t much like cooking, trust me, go with the pedal. If you want to make your own meal the way you want it, or are looking to elevate your culinary skills, put your apron on.


    Hope that made sense.

  • ... and of course, Lexicon is famous also for its 'verbs' ability to be set at what would be for most other algos' way-too-wet levels.


    IOW, perfect for musicians who're not studio boffins and would therefore be more-inclined to crank the wet-dry mix beyond the point at which a typical engineer would settle. Instead of muddying-up or washing-out a mix at this point, it continues to shine and sound "musical".


    Also, it's worth noting that the company spent decades designing its algorithms not necessarily to sound "realistic", but pleasing-to-the-ear and, again, "musical".

  • IOW, perfect for musicians who're not studio boffins and would therefore be more-inclined to crank the wet-dry mix beyond the point at which a typical engineer would settle. Instead of muddying-up or washing-out a mix at this point, it continues to shine and sound "musical".

    Guilty! I have this plate reverb preset on the PCM that’s taken from the classic 480L. I love it so much and most definitely mix it too wet.


    I was encouraged by the delay algos overhaul that I learned Kemper released. Obviously they’re not trying to recreate a whole Lexicon inside, but the direction of a larger algorithm that can be used to generate different delay effects is what I like to see. I trust the new reverbs will be a nice addition. The samples from ToneJunkie TV point heavily in that direction.

  • ... and of course, Lexicon is famous also for its 'verbs' ability to be set at what would be for most other algos' way-too-wet levels.


    IOW, perfect for musicians who're not studio boffins and would therefore be more-inclined to crank the wet-dry mix beyond the point at which a typical engineer would settle. Instead of muddying-up or washing-out a mix at this point, it continues to shine and sound "musical".


    Also, it's worth noting that the company spent decades designing its algorithms not necessarily to sound "realistic", but pleasing-to-the-ear and, again, "musical".

  • Meant to comment on that quote from MM but, on an iPad with this new forum, I couldn’t work out how to comment under it - it wanted me to change Nicky’s words.


    Anyway


    Wanted to say ‘good point’. I’m looking forward to these for crazy creative possibilities and also for ‘just playing alone and making it sound great’. I haven’t done anything live in about 18 months and, for recording, 95% of the time I record dry. I’m always playing through Studio One into my monitors so I have the Slate verbs plugin on the go in there to ‘sound ok’ and then I dial in the reverb required later in the recording I’m doing.


    Whilst I love writing songs and playing about to make them sound as good as I can, I’m lazy with mixing - I don’t have the love of that process that some folks do. For all the compression / eq / limiting etc, I use the Izotope plugins these days which automate things. They wouldn’t be a substitute for an experience mixer but they add years of talent to my minimal mixing ability due to me just not enjoying learning every mix trick going. I’d rather write a song and create it, not bugger about in a DAW.


    Reverb is one thing that can’t be automated yet and I was definitely guilty of using too much of it all the time. Still so probably! So these days the Kemper verbs are for creative reasons (hence me loving the spring) and hopefully some of the whackiest ones in the new update will inspire me to write something a bit different. But for ‘meat and two veg’ guitar parts as part of a track? I find it’s much safer to do the reverb in the daw :)

  • I'm intrigued to find out what it is you're missing from what's already there? Not saying you're wrong, just interested. I think everyone is chomping at the bit to try these new algorithms out :-)

    In term of Reverbs, I can't get the reverbs i'm having on my big sky right now. I essentially use the cloud preset on the big sky and I don't think I can get this sound on the kemper as it is right now.

    When the update is here, I'll only need my remote and expression pedal ! No more FX loop, no more midi sending to pilote my reverb and delay.

    Buying the kemper, I ended up selling all my pedals...



  • Totally, great writeup, thanks! I don't think the BigSky menus are "too much", my mentality is more like, getting to know all parameters across all different engines is probably gonna take a while before I'll get to the point where I'll know which settings to go to for the effect I want. I am however motivated to do that, so maybe I should use the Strymon pedals as a stepping stone for a while. The PCM isnt that pricey anyway, but rarely pops up on auction sites in my area. But I think I'll definitely want to mess around with one. I do like cooking from scratch 😊

  • Totally, great writeup, thanks! I don't think the BigSky menus are "too much", my mentality is more like, getting to know all parameters across all different engines is probably gonna take a while before I'll get to the point where I'll know which settings to go to for the effect I want. I am however motivated to do that, so maybe I should use the Strymon pedals as a stepping stone for a while. The PCM isnt that pricey anyway, but rarely pops up on auction sites in my area. But I think I'll definitely want to mess around with one. I do like cooking from scratch 😊

    A cheaper transition may be picking up a used Lexicon MPX1 or MPX-G2 (practically the same as the MPX1, but with an analog preamp added). In some ways like a "lite" version of a PCM, but you can also stack effects on top of each other in one patch (chorus, delay, reverb,EQ, etc).


    I'm not sure if you already own a Kemper or not, but based on the block diagrams they published, it seems the delays in the Kemper can already get you started in learning about basic principles like cross feedback, adding modulation to repeats, multi-tap delays, smear (diffusion), and stereo imaging.

  • There was a dude on here recently stating that the rackmount effects from the 80s/90s were way easier to edit than the Kemper.