I heard a rumor about a new Kemper Reverb that compete BIG SKY or IMMERSE type of reverb

  • Kemper 2? Pfft. Old news. I know for a fact there's a Kemper 3 in the works. It not only profiles your amp, it also profiles your groupies.


    Unless you're a bass player - there's still not enough processing power or storage. Storage mostly.


    KPA Unpowered Rack, Kemper Remote, X32 Rack, uTrack 24, MTP AV,BC Rich Mockingbird(s)

  • Verbs, Verbs, Verbs! You guys are so one dimensional. What about Nouns, Adjectives, etc? When will Kemper be releasing updates to these? ;)


    There will absolutely be a Kemper 2. Eventually the parts in the design will be too expensive to purchase for Kemper. As a Chief Engineer, I can tell you that these days, parts suppliers may well tell you the part will be "supported" for some length of time; however, what gets you in trouble is price and availability.


    I have looked around and haven't found much technical information about the DSP in the KPA. The processing chip NXP LPC2468FBD208 doesn't appear to be a DSP chip at all. If CK is managing to to real time convolutions and EFX processing inside of this chip, then it is impressive programming indeed.


    My gut tells me there must be a true DSP chip somewhere inside the KPA. I am too lazy to open mine up and look though ;) Pretty pathetic eh?


  • Clicky

  • The NXP LPC2468FBD208, located on the riser board, is the ARM based I/O controller chip. Its main job is to provide USB, Ethernet, memory interface and general housekeeping of the OS. The NXP Symphony DSP56720, on the otherhand, is the actual DSP responsible for all audio functions due to the fact that it was designed for audio applications. It is a dual core DSP whereas the I/O controller chip is single core.

  • Ok Kemper - you've got something. We know it, you know it. You finished the reverbs 6 months ago but held that update so you could release it with this new hardware at NAMM.


    I'm betting on a floor controller all in one that doesn't profile.

  • There will absolutely be a Kemper 2. Eventually the parts in the design will be too expensive to purchase for Kemper. As a Chief Engineer, I can tell you that these days, parts suppliers may well tell you the part will be "supported" for some length of time; however, what gets you in trouble is price and availability.

    Yup. NXP guaranteed 10 years of availability for the DSP chip after launch. That 10 years came up this past May. CK is not foolish enough to wait until there are supply issues to start sourcing and redesigning around a new chip, even if it's an updated chip from the same family (which it likely isn't, NXP's last 24-bit DSP chip update was also in 2008). I'm sure that May 2018 date was marked in someone's calendar with an alert to go off 2 years in advance :)

  • Yup. NXP guaranteed 10 years of availability for the DSP chip after launch. That 10 years came up this past May. CK is not foolish enough to wait until there are supply issues to start sourcing and redesigning around a new chip, even if it's an updated chip from the same family (which it likely isn't, NXP's last 24-bit DSP chip update was also in 2008). I'm sure that May 2018 date was marked in someone's calendar with an alert to go off 2 years in advance :)

    I double checked the NXP website. The DSP is indeed only covered for 10 years after the initial introduction back in May 2008. The issue now is that NXP are not making any more DSPs based around the 56k platform so it's got to be FPGAs or a complete rewrite and optimisation of code based around something like a SHARC or similar. The question now is: Has the team been working on a parallel development stream based on existing tech and the supposed new platform? Do they have enough resources to take on such a task and deliver it relatively soon? We know the DSP is now in shaky territory in regards supply as from May 2018 (unless Kemper bought a healthy pool to build from) but that's all we really know for sure right now.

  • The question now is: Has the team been working on a parallel development stream based on existing tech and the supposed new platform? Do they have enough resources to take on such a task and deliver it relatively soon?

    Time will certainly tell. It's a very good question.


    The reverbs are done on the current platform, that's a given. I'd imagine that for a small team, parallel development might be a tall order, especially if going to a completely new chip architecture, and taking into consideration the other hardware changes that would be going in a V2 Kemper unit. Either way, I'm prone to assume they've secured a supply of current DSP chips to hold them over during development of a new unit.

  • So who's expecting the new reverbs to be available before the end of next week? Surely they'll have to bring something new to this year's NAMM, after not announcing anything at last year's Winter NAMM (I'm going by the Andertons interview). Or do people believe we'll be waiting several more months even after an announcement for something to drop? If they've finishing working on the preset management already, maybe they'll wait to finish the next feature, whatever that may be.


    I'm optimistic about a new update happening soon, but, that said, I've been optimistic since September ?(

  • Yup. NXP guaranteed 10 years of availability for the DSP chip after launch. That 10 years came up this past May.

    I know next to nothing on this subject, but you seems to base all your thinking around the fact that AT LAUNCH, NXP guaranteed 10 years of availability. Isn't this availability directly correlated to market needs ? If Kemper Gmbh or who knows who is still ordering big amounts of chips every year, don't you think this availability time could be much longer ?