Kemper not loud enough (solved)

  • Hello,
    I’ve been using the Kemper for a while and I do love this unit but I came across a problematic live situation. I’ve got a big band gig coming up without pa and tis poses a problem. The Kemper is not loud enough to get over all those trumpets, sax, trombone etc. I can not hear myself play. I play through a headrush cab on the main output. What can I do to cut through?

  • Hello,
    I’ve been using the Kemper for a while and I do love this unit but I came across a problematic live situation. I’ve got a big band gig coming up without pa and tis poses a problem. The Kemper is not loud enough to get over all those trumpets, sax, trombone etc. I can not hear myself play. I play through a headrush cab on the main output. What can I do to cut through?

    I can 100% guarantee you the Kemper is loud enough. I used my Kemper for an outdoor show in front of 10,000 opening for Disturbed and had to turn it DOWN because it was so loud I couldn’t hear the rest of my band in the monitors (professional front monitors and side fills). My guess is your headrush cab isn’t cutting it. I’d look at a better FRFR cab/monitor.


    After that, look at your profiles. If you have a profile that is thin or not EQ’d right, it’s not going to cut through a mix. For example, go to any profile you have and turn the mids all the way up. You’ll see how it’ll seem louder even though you didn’t touch the volume. I’m not saying to do this to correct your issue, just using it as an example of how proper EQ can affect volume and the way your sound cuts through.


    Before I switched over to in-ear monitors, I used a Yamaha DXR15 for my speaker. As I mentioned above, that was way more volume than anyone could need. If you’re looking to use this at a gig without a PA, I would recommend putting a cab (or monitor) on each side of the stage so that your sound is coming off the stage equally as opposed to just the side that your cab is sitting on. Otherwise, anyone who is on the opposite side of the stage as you (depending on how big the stage is) isn’t going to hear your sound as much as someone standing in front of you.

  • Okay.. so you're using an unpowered KPA into a Headrush powered cab, right?


    If so, then the problem isn't the Kemper. You need a louder/better FRFR.

    Or, you can Uncheck the -12 dB box on Page 1 of the Output Menu to get 12 dB more Output.


    Does your Master Volume control the level of your Maim Outputs?


    If yes, you can calibrate maximum values of the two Outputs.


    With the Headrush turned OFF:
    Turn the Master Volume up all the way. On Page 2 of the Output Menu, turn the Main Output up all the way.


    Exit the Output Menu, turn the Master Volume Down all the way.


    Turn the Headrush on. Turn up the KPA Volume.

  • And stand back! I have have the Headrush and only turn it up to 7 (it goes to 11.) Its 2000 watts get really loud, and clear, a s%#t-ton of headroom.

  • Okay.. so you're using an unpowered KPA into a Headrush powered cab, right?


    If so, then the problem isn't the Kemper. You need a louder/better FRFR.

    Oh no, I have a powered Kemper. The headrush should cut it. 2000 watts seem enough. I will try the other options mentioned here. If this does not work there is always the old valve amp option. :) Thank you for the help.

  • @rockarena the powered Kemper should be loud as #£&*. As Paul mentioned alreadymake sure the -12db option isn’t ticked.


    If you can’t hear yourself on stage in a big band setting it is most likely to do with your position on stage relative to the cabinet and the horns.


    Get the cabinet off the floor and preferably angled towards your head a little.


    Playing with a 5 piece horn section in a soul band for 23 years I can assure you that horn players were the bane of my life! They are always so loud they drown everything else out but still complain they can’t hear themselves on stage so NEED more monitor; which obviously just makes the problem worse for everyone else. The only solution I ever found was to make sure I was set up on the other side of the stage from the horns. In a big band the whole stage is pretty much horns though ;( So just make sure you are as far away from (and behind) the trumpets; and if possible trombones.


    There are two things at play here. The first is out and out volume; horns are LOUD. Big bands had lots of horns to make them even louder although that eventually lead to more harmoic options the initial reason in the dance band era was VOLUME.


    The secod is frequency range. Often the horn parts sit in the same register as the guitar and mask your sound on stage. We always ended up with the bass next to the horns because they were in a different register which made it easier to hear everyone’s parts more clearly.

  • The only solution I ever found was to make sure I was set up on the other side of the stage from the horns

    A very good advice :)
    I'm playing also in a big band about Years (still I'm playing in a bigband) and try not to stay in front off drums, horns and trombones.
    It's also a matter to protect my ears.
    For me a monitor Behringer B210D (170W) is loud enough on the stage even when I play a solo .
    The mains are connected to FOH.

  • But the monitor output doesn’t give me access to delay etc. Or is this a misconception on my part?

    Misconception. In the Output settings, you can set the source for all the outputs as you see fit (including Master Mono/Stereo, which taps the signal at the very end of the chain). Of course, the Monitor output on its own is mono, but the latest beta firmware allows you to use monitor out and direct out as a stereo pair, if you so wish.

  • Yes

    i think that’s a problem. Your Headrush is powered already so you should be sending just the profile, not any power from the KPA.


    Maybe you have damaged the Headrush and that’s where your problem is. Maybe not, I’m not sure.
    But you should be using the “monitor out”


    I did the same thing when I first got my Yahaha DXR10...I just didn’t know what I was doing. The kind folks here corrected me.


    To be honest, the manual, while very good, wasn’t clear about this to a beginner like me (I’ve been playing guitar for 35 years but the KPA was my first ever digital unit.) I remember thinking the manual could have been more explicit.