NAMM 2019

  • here is more info on the new celestion speaker:


    That's not the speaker that Celsestion worked with Kemper to produce, though. It might utilize similar characteristics, but if the bone-stock FX-200 was able to achieve what Christoph wanted he wouldn't have invested his time working with Celestion to produce the new speaker for his cabs. It's not like he sits around the house all day eating corn chips and watching cartoons, he's a pretty busy guy.

  • That's not the speaker that Celsestion worked with Kemper to produce, though. It might utilize similar characteristics, but if the bone-stock FX-200 was able to achieve what Christoph wanted he wouldn't have invested his time working with Celestion to produce the new speaker for his cabs. It's not like he sits around the house all day eating corn chips and watching cartoons, he's a pretty busy guy.


    Hello Frodebro,


    Please note the qualifications, highlighted in bold blue font:

    Hi MKB,


    Interestingly enough, I come to the opposite conclusion...but this is part of the fun about speculation. I originally posted this over on TGP , but it is apropos here as well:


    I wouldn't be surprised if the new Kemper Kabinet speaker is a derivative/variant of the new Celestion F12-X200. The reason being that Christoph mentioned that they will be selling the speaker separately to KPA owners to retrofit in their own cabs. A derivative of the F12-X200 makes a lot of sense, as not only is it FRFR (co-axial-based), but the cross-over circuit is integrated and built-in to the speaker itself. That makes things completely simple to retrofit into a cabinet designed around a standard 12" Celestion guitar speaker mounting arrangement -- no additional wiring, soldering and mounting of cross-over circuitry is required.

  • Christoph says "broadband" everyone else is saying "full range" which is the point I was trying to make. It might be best to take FRFR out of the vocabulary for this product.

  • Christoph says "broadband" everyone else is saying "full range" which is the point I was trying to make. It might be best to take FRFR out of the vocabulary for this product.

    Hsello ElDoca,


    Christoph also uses an uncommon/rare English word for "proprietary", when he says "bespoke" speaker. I imagine that both the terms "broadband" and "bespoke" are how Christoph translates the equivalent vernacular German terms for "full range" and "proprietary-custom build by others" over to English.


    In any case, assuming (and again, I fully acknowledge this is speculation) that the Kemper Kone is based upon (a derivative of) the Celestion F12-X200, than it is absolutely appropriate industry standards to classify it as "full-range", given the 60 Hz - 20 Khz published specifications.


    Cheers,

    John

  • Hello Frodebro,


    Please note the qualifications, highlighted in bold blue font:

    I posted what I did because I've seen more than one person here and on TGP thinking that the new Kemper speaker is going to be the same thing as Celestion's existing FX-200, which it's pretty much certain not to be.


    Celestion makes a proprietary Vintage 30 for Mesa/Boogie that you won't find in cabs by any other manufacturer. It's not just that Randall Smith wants them made in England, but there is also a tweak to the voicing.


    It's probably the same thing with the new Kemper speaker: Start with an existing model, and then tweak it from there to achieve the desired results for this particular application. It wouldn't surprise me if the wattage rating was increased as well, as the powered KPA has enough clean power on tap to smoke the voice coil in the stock FX-200, which would be a warranty concern for sure.

  • Quote



    I posted what I did because I've seen more than one person here and on TGP thinking that the new Kemper speaker is going to be the same thing as Celestion's existing FX-200, which it's pretty much certain not to be.

    So besides the wattage handling on the KPA speaker, what else specifically might be different between it and the FX-200 then?

    If you use FRFR the benefit of a merged profile is that the cabinet is totally separated in the profile.


    For my edification only... :D Kemper/Helix user

  • So besides the wattage handling on the KPA speaker, what else specifically might be different between it and the FX-200 then?

    FRFR speakers tend to have a fairly wide dispersion due to their design, Mr. Kemper brought up the "beaminess" of the Kemper speaker a couple of times, so I'm guessing that the Kemper speaker, though essentially full range, was tweaked to behave more like a guitar speaker and less like a typical FRFR speaker.


    Either way, this is all just another "Hey, let's all run this for 200 pages speculating and arguing about something that doesn't even exist in the wild yet" thread, so we're all just throwing out ideas to keep ourselves entertained until the cabs hit the market.

  • Where did I read the Kemper said it was NOT a coaxial speaker? If that is true, then it's not based on the Celestion F12-X200, but more likely something like the Celestion K12H-200TC.

    Ben,


    I haven't seen anything like that. If you can find that quote/citation by a Kemper official, then indeed it would confirm that the Kemper Kone is not in fact based upon the coaxial F12-X200.

  • Found where I read it... on TGP. I asked the poster where he got that information.

    Hi Ben,


    I replied to that TGP conversation before seeing your above reply. LOL. In any event, I believe Otter351 is reading something into the press release that just isn't there. Moreover, I would come to the complete opposite conclusion, based on the press release -- however, I would never say it was definitive. Seems to me everything is still conjecture at this point, and we will have to wait to find out the answer to this question, hopefully soon, by some official Kemper representative.


    Cheers,

    John

  • C'mon CK, I love you brother, but "full-range" describes the bandwidth and has nothing to do with the response.


    "Flat-response", whilst there's wiggle room due to its being a practical impossibility (without DSP correction), is at least a basic differentiator between something that responds at any given frequency and something else that does so faithfully / accurately.


    A terrible response is still a response; a generic descriptor is necessary IMHO.