Paid Profile sharing

  • Please share your thoughts on profile sharing? I personally think, that it is OK. Once you buy the files, you own them. And you can do what you want with them. If you want to share them with someone else, that’s your prerogative. Can you sell them or make money off them? No. I even believe that the people making these profiles and selling them even expect that they are going to be shared to a certain extent and price them accordingly. I’m curious to see what most of you think.

  • Whether you can or not doesn’t make it right. I personally feel the sellers of these profiles keep pricing very reasonable and it would be a shame to not compensate them for their work. If your friend likes a profile you have purchased, they should support the original profiler and purchase the pack themselves.


    There are plenty of free profiles available, many of which are generously provided by many of these profilers.

  • just my 2 cents. Buying something does not make you the owner. Especially digital goods are usually just usage license you purchase. Find a profiler you like and join that community as well. You might even have some wishes heard.

    once a purist, then analog pragmatic and finally a digital believer who found out that you can't hear a mosquito fart in a band-context.

  • just my 2 cents. Buying something does not make you the owner. Especially digital goods are usually just usage license you purchase. Find a profiler you like and join that community as well. You might even have some wishes heard.

    I have to agree - it’s the same with downloaded music so why would it be different with commercial profiles?

  • You have to treat profiles like any software. In otherwords you didn't buy the profiles. You bought the right to use those profiles as per the licence agreement between you and the seller. Like most software licences, they are usually nontransferable unless you sell them on as a complete package so giving someone a copy of the profile is essentially pirating the software. Just like giving someone a copy of windows for free.

  • Very tricky issue....how do you think the original makers of the amps, mics and studio gear feel about profit being made from profiles created using their patented equipment?


    We can consider purchased profiles to be software or creative work product like music or art and I think they should not be pirated but to some extent the profiles themselves might be considered to be a technology that allows us to use "pirated" sounds.

  • Definitely not cool. As others have said, you only own the right to use profiles. I’m about to release my first commercial profile pack, the cost of which will be determined by many factors including number of work hours, cost of equipment, quantity of profiles, and of course, my 25+ years of experience. You know what doesn’t factor into the final price? The possibility of thieves using absurd justifications to distribute my work without authorization. I can’t imagine any profile producer would inflate his/her prices under the expectation of theft.


    To the OP: I hope you’re just speaking hypothetically, because I kind of get the impression that you may have already shared commercial profiles, and are looking for moral support here. Don’t expect to find any.

  • I respect and accept the restrictions and price. I bought several packs. But i have more of a copyleft, creative commons, linux, etc..mindset. I think commercial profiles should not be permitted, i think most of them are way too overpriced. And i think its an abuse when they don't have a demo profile, or the chance to return it if you are not satisfied. That is true when some of the sellers let you change the bought pack if you are not satisfied, when they have principles. I bet 90% or more of the profiles are never used for this reason, most of the people just buy just in case the holy grial of tone is in the next pack, but..no way.

    I think it is not a honest profit.


    Alternative: crowdfunding the profiling session. When the budget is reached.. profiles for all.


    Its a political mindset..nothing more. Maybe because i am not very happy with predator capitalist mindset.

  • IBut i have more of a copyleft, creative commons, linux, etc..mindset. I think commercial profiles should not be permitted, i think most of them are way too overpriced. And i think its an abuse when they don't have a demo profile, or the chance to return it if you are not satisfied.

    I get what you're saying... but the solution here isn't anything more than voting wth your wallet, right? There are 13,461 profiles in RM at the moment. ;)


    KPA Unpowered Rack, Kemper Remote, X32 Rack, uTrack 24, MTP AV,BC Rich Mockingbird(s)

  • You know what doesn’t factor into the final price? The possibility of thieves using absurd justifications to distribute my work without authorization. I can’t imagine any profile producer would inflate his/her prices under the expectation of theft.

    That would be like shooting yourself in both feet. More people would rely on fewer to buy the product and share it the more-expensive it became.


    IMHO, factoring in theft should mean that you reduce your prices to counter the incentive to steal.

  • We went down the bottomless depth of software licenses in the other topic about impulse responses.


    I think there is a simple logical test, if by giving the profile away you decrease the sales of the original creator, you are in fact hurting them financially and it is NOT cool to do so.


    Clearly the profile creator invested some money to buy the microphone(s), etc to make that profile. And also, their experience has to be worth something as well.

  • To add to what ToneDeaf said above, would you want to disincentivise pro producers from producing killer profiles and be left with the rig manager that has less than stellar amateur profiles? You get what you pay for. If you want kick ass profiles that help to elevate the value of your Profiler then you pay for the profiles and keep them as safe as you would your profiler. If you do not approve of commercial profiles and their licencing terms then don't buy.

  • Please share your thoughts on profile sharing? I personally think, that it is OK. Once you buy the files, you own them. And you can do what you want with them. If you want to share them with someone else, that’s your prerogative. Can you sell them or make money off them? No. I even believe that the people making these profiles and selling them even expect that they are going to be shared to a certain extent and price them accordingly. I’m curious to see what most of you think.

    that fundamentally wrong. if you buy a profile, you buy a license unless it's only sold once and all rights are transferred to you. In any case, whatever you eventually plan to do, don't post Profiles you don't have the rights for here or to Rig Exchange. Don't post links either.

  • IMHO, factoring in theft should mean that you reduce your prices to counter the incentive to steal.

    Price has very, very little to do with theft. Cars, wallets, shoplifting, it doesn't matter. The kind of people who are prone to steal will steal. For that subset of humanity, the only thing keeping them from doing it on any given day is consequences.


    The fundamental problem is that in the digital world, it's almost impossible to keep people from stealing or catch them when they do, let alone apply consequences. This is made worse by the fact that the penalties for stealing digital goods aren't the same as for physical ones. Go to a music store, stick a CD under your jacket and walk out the door. If you get caught, you get arrested and go to jail for shoplifting (which somehow seems nicer than being called a thief). However, even if a policeman stands over your shoulder and watches you download the mp3 version of the album from a pirate site, chances are that there's very little he could do about it. And yet, in both cases the music was stolen (and musicians get screwed).


    No consequences, no disincentive. Add the Internet to the mix and it's a thief's wet dream.


    What happens next is all sorts of philosophical talk about why copyrights are wrong, "information wants to be free," if it doesn't cost you anything to make a copy of the item then it shouldn't cost the customer anything, yada, yada. It's all nonsense of course, but people will come up with all sorts of pretzel logic to justify stealing so they don't feel bad about themselves. And yet, it's very black and white, no matter how grey their conscience would like it to be - if someone charges for a product and you take it without paying, it's theft. That doesn't change from product to product.


    And that leads to another difficulty. Since there's no way to stop people from stealing digital products, or even know that they're doing it, societies across the globe have developed a sense of acceptance and entitlement. Since "everyone is doing it," and nobody really wants to admit that they're no different than the person who walks out of a store with a CD under their jacket, it's become socially acceptable to steal digital products. In fact, many consider it their birthright to take someone else's product whether it's free or not since, you know, people shouldn't charge for digital stuff anyway.


    Since you can steal stuff on a computer and easily get away with it, a huge number of people now routinely do exactly that. And since it's become socially acceptable to steal, they feel perfectly okay about doing so. I suppose this is a good sociology exercise since it highlights the fact that the average person has no moral dilemma with screwing other people if they can get away with it. We used to teach our children that stealing is bad. Apparently now we teach them that it's okay if you don't get caught, or if everyone else is doing it.


    Honor is doing the right thing even when no one is looking. Clearly it's a concept that's no longer in fashion.