Rig Manager 3.0 Editor

  • No it's not passive-aggressive or any other made up BS, you don't know me, I really don't care about others insecurities. It's much easier to fiddle knobs than play guitar, therefore more people twiddle knobs than play guitar and hardware manufacturers know it. Some of these people become great producers, to push it even further, a few of them (surprisingly, one of the best) admit that they were more inclined to play with gear than guitars, so they have made a career out of it and produced quite a a lot of great albums. In some rare cases they can do both.


    Bottom line is, editor may or may not be a handy thing to have, depends on a person. We know it's coming, so whole discussion is purely a banter.

    Ahh... never mind. Not worth perpetuating.

    “Without music, life would be a mistake.” - Friedrich Nietzsche

    Edited once, last by Ruefus ().

  • Lots of insecure people here :). I never said it was anything wrong with it or it wasn't useful. People made a great careers out of twiddling knobs.

    I'm not insecure at all, I am just explaining the role that the editor could play for those of us who don't think that they need one :) I have attended art school, and many of the techniques I learnt are transferable into the music world. I am convinced that anybody who wants to make great records will love the functionality that the editor brings to the table :thumbup:

  • The interface for the more complex effects, like the reverbs and delays is many pages deep. That is terrible design in terms of ergonomics and is the opposite extreme to being able to see at a glance how the patch is set up on one page of parameters. Any DSP plugin on other platforms (VST, UA, Protools etc) would put the key parameters in a large GUI - a single page - and many use graphical methods to display envelopes etc. The editor and a decent preset saving system for the effects will make all the power that is in the newer delays and reverbs easy to exploit and that will be a big step forward for the KPA.

  • The interface for the more complex effects, like the reverbs and delays is many pages deep. That is terrible design in terms of ergonomics and is the opposite extreme to being able to see at a glance how the patch is set up on one page of parameters. Any DSP plugin on other platforms (VST, UA, Protools etc) would put the key parameters in a large GUI - a single page - and many use graphical methods to display envelopes etc. The editor and a decent preset saving system for the effects will make all the power that is in the newer delays and reverbs easy to exploit and that will be a big step forward for the KPA.

    I totally agree with this one, I started to want the editor after delays been released, despite not using them that much, it's just fun to play with them from time to time and there is a lot of pages to scroll through. New preset system is neat, will work even better when supported by external software. Kemper Stage is another important reason, nobody wants people to hurt their backs and knees.


    Having said that, Damian's ToastME is really good editor too, I may even stay with it if I find it better than upcoming Kemper one.

  • People made a great careers out of twiddling knobs.

    I can no longer play guitar as well as I was able to play just 5 years ago. In my case it is the result of ulnar nerve

    issues in both arms. Sadly, ulnar redirection surgery two years ago was unsuccessful.


    However, I can still 'twiddle knobs', so I haven't sold my studio or my guitars.


    Creating tone that stands out can be as valuable to the success of a piece of music as the melody and lyrics.


    Having said that, I know a very successful hooker that has retired to Tahiti from the money

    she made from her career of twiddling knobs.

  • As noted elsewhere, I've always kinda sucked at dialing in basic tones no matter which amps I had, so I really enjoy the ability to just select a profile that's already "there" for me and play guitar. And yet, I'm quite looking forward to the editor.


    Where it will be useful for a guy like me is the effects. I'll still just select profiles that have the base tone I'm looking for, but often for a cover band thing I'm looking for the signature sounds from the record. For example, it was easy to find a fat rock profile for Still of the Night by Whitesnake that didn't require any adjustments, but there's also a middle section with arpeggios that has some delay and wobbly bits in it.


    I was able to find the effects and tweak the params to match what I wanted using the toaster buttons and knobs. I do usually prefer hardware interfaces, e.g. a Mackie MCU for my DAW, but in this case the small screen means lots of paging around. Of course, that's just a design reality for this sort of thing as there's only so much physical space available on the front panel.


    So, even though I'm not what you'd really consider a tweaker of tones - which is pretty much a required talent if you're using a Line 6 or Fractal product - there are times when I do need to dial effects in. It'll be nice to see how much easier that becomes with the editor. From the brief videos I saw from the trade show floor, it looks like it's nicely done.

  • This is my use case as well.

  • No offense but all the "no editor necessary" folks sound like Steve Jobs when he declared the iPhone would never have third party apps.

    John Maracich
    SpaceMetalNOLA.com
    facebook.com/spacemetalnola
    spacemetal1.bandcamp.com
    spacemetal.net

  • It's ridiculous how long this is taking to ship.

    Ah, the bane of my existence (I develop software for a living).


    Programmers are almost always given unrealistic deadlines because, you know, "It's ridiculous how long it takes to write high quality software. It shouldn't take so long! In fact, we're just going to release it next Friday, so guys, make sure it's done by then, okay?" Of course, these deadlines are typically given to us by people who have never written a line of code in their life (looking at you, Marketing).


    On the upside, once it's out the door we get to listen to a new complaint.


    "It's ridiculous how many problems there are with this software! Why didn't they take the time to test and fix the problems before releasing it?"


    I for one think the developers should take as much time as they need to get 3.0 finished. From what I've seen so far, it looks very cool. Why rush them into delivering something that's not ready? What they really want (as do all programmers) is to deliver something awesome. Personally, I want to encourage that, even if it means I have to wait a little longer.


    Of course, the possibility exists that I don't have a completely unbiased perspective. :)