I need to add more treble on every profile when i play with a band

  • Just a remark. It is funny but all the sounds I create at home are more warm and got more bass. But when I go practice with my bands it is lost in the mix a little so I have to add treble and presence to be heard. Is it the same to you? I mean it is not really a problem for me it is probably normal


    I was just wondering if it was the same for you ???

  • On ongoing struggle for me is using the KPA live. If I used anything scooped it just gets lost. If I use more mid-heavy or treble-heavy profiles that cut, it feels thin and cold alongside my other guitarist that uses an Orange with a 4x12.


    I'm using the powerhead with a passive Mission Gemini 2x12. The coldness is something you just always have to live with in the digital realm but I'm beginning to suspect the KPA power amp is part of what leaves me underwhelmed. I've heard the Fryette Power Station does well to give back some of the warm tubeyness that gets lost, but you're also introducing more weight that way.

  • any sound dialed in to give you a great solo sound at home is pretty much guaranteed to fail in a live setting. That's not an issue of the PROFILER, it's just how acoustics and your ear work. You'd have exactly the same issue with tube amps.

    Mids are your friend - also a healthy dose of high end.

  • digital does not have a sound.

    otherwise, how could you have perfect sonic representations of 'classic' performances on a CD?

    I didn't mean it has a sound, but it is flat. It's 1's and 0's at the end of the day.


    We all choose digital because at a certain point the convenience of it in many ways is just easier to handle and maintain. But listening to a CD vs Vinyl is a completely different experience. And I'm talking true vinyl, not the stuff they make now which was all digitally recorded, mixed, mastered, etc.


    My point was mainly about the "flatness" or "coldness" of digital sound. I've experienced this with other devices, which in my mind makes it more of a reality one has to accept and adapt to. Though, it's definitely improved from decades past which means it will probably continue to improve.

  • Just a remark. It is funny but all the sounds I create at home are more warm and got more bass. But when I go practice with my bands it is lost in the mix a little so I have to add treble and presence to be heard. Is it the same to you? I mean it is not really a problem for me it is probably normal


    I was just wondering if it was the same for you ???

    I just adjust the output block for *certain* live settings- but then again, as the only guitar player in my band - and also the sound man, I'm at a bit of an advantage


    KPA Unpowered Rack, Kemper Remote, X32 Rack, uTrack 24, MTP AV,BC Rich Mockingbird(s)

  • ......... You'd have exactly the same issue with tube amps.....

    That's right, though the effect is much stronger with FRFR-Speakers, because guitar-speakers are limited to highend Response when cranked, while FRFR-Speakers amplify the whole frequency-spectrum and by this the Fletcher-Munson-Effect is more evident.

  • I agree with the general point...something that sounds good on its own does not necessarily sound good with a band, so yes I do the same and it is the same with any type of amp. Mid's and a sprinkle of treble ( although I love treble anyway - always on full on my car stereo ).


    One other factor is is guitar band vs dual. Dual guitar you are also battling the same frequency range as your collegue/friend/opponent :)


    I found I could get away with/needed a much fatter sound when I was the only guitarist to fill it out...

  • One other factor is is guitar band vs dual. Dual guitar you are also battling the same frequency range as your collegue/friend/opponent :)

    I saw an interesting video once on EQ for dual guitar bands where he talked about boosting a frequency or two for one guitarist and cutting the exact same frequencies for the other.


    The boost / cut amount wasn't huge and obviously something done at FOH or in the studio final mix, but the idea was to give each guitar some personal space in the frequency spectrum so that they could be heard instead of just stomping on each other and muddying up the same set of frequencies.


    If you have a keyboard player, who can often compete in the guitar frequency range, you'd just extend the concept to three instruments instead of two.


    Of course, if you're the only guitarist, as you said, you need to fill all that space yourself so life is a bit easier.

  • Yeah, I think generally people hope they won;t clash, mainly becuase they are using different Amps that therefore generate different tonal signatures..


    I'm lucky that our other guitarist has a Helix so his sound is naturally thin and fizzy.....SORRY I am joking. His sound is actually really good but we have recently been talking about eq and cut so this is interesting.

  • I saw an interesting video once on EQ for dual guitar bands where he talked about boosting a frequency or two for one guitarist and cutting the exact same frequencies for the other.


    The boost / cut amount wasn't huge and obviously something done at FOH or in the studio final mix, but the idea was to give each guitar some personal space in the frequency spectrum so that they could be heard instead of just stomping on each other and muddying up the same set of frequencies.

    This is exactly what the Kemper Stereo Widener effect does in the eq section. You have to use it sparingly, or it loads the sound to one side because the mid range will be more noticeable.

  • I didn't mean it has a sound, but it is flat. It's 1's and 0's at the end of the day.


    We all choose digital because at a certain point the convenience of it in many ways is just easier to handle and maintain. But listening to a CD vs Vinyl is a completely different experience. And I'm talking true vinyl, not the stuff they make now which was all digitally recorded, mixed, mastered, etc.


    My point was mainly about the "flatness" or "coldness" of digital sound. I've experienced this with other devices, which in my mind makes it more of a reality one has to accept and adapt to. Though, it's definitely improved from decades past which means it will probably continue to improve.

    I disagree 1000% with you. But I won't debate it with you, coz you're the kind of person that think he is right and it will be an endless debate

  • If there’s another guitarist in your band don’t worry about tweaking EQ, just make sure you’re louder than they are. (This is a joke, but you know it’s true!)

    No I mean we hear the keyboard more and to be heard I gotta boost presence and treble on every rigs. Then its fine But at home it's too much treble and presence