Profiler Stage Introduction Thread

  • Haven't been on the forums in a while, got on yesterday and saw the announcement. Very cool.


    I just bought my toaster and remote last November, but I feel no buyer's remorse with the release of the Stage. Went to play with some guys last weekend and both fit in my bag, so it's certainly portable enough to suit me. I also enjoy having the head on a stand to make it easy to fool around with things on the fly without having to bend over. That and the fact that I'm mostly a studio rat these days makes the toaster a good fit for me, and just add remote when needed.


    That said, if I was gigging on a regular basis this would be a great addition for a grab-it-and-go setup. Load it up with the night's requirements, set it on the stage, and done. Since it's the same type casing as the remote I can attest to the "built like a tank" statement, which is more than I can say for a lot of floor gear I've had over the years. I'm really surprised that it's a full on profiler. I would have guessed a product like this would just be a limited playback only kinda thing. Even that would have been cool.


    I think they're going to have more trouble keeping up with demand than they are trying to sell them.

  • Cool.... wish I could install it, but my Rig Manager is still stuck in an older version ever since Kemper changed their certificate. I haven't found a way to update it and I refuse to turn on automatic updates in Windows 7 or update to Windows 10

    You've reached the end of the line for updates to your Kemper then, unless you stop using RM altogether. You've obviously got your reasons for doing this, but as an IT manager I can't think of any. In a few months Win7 joins XP in the graveyard.

  • You've reached the end of the line for updates to your Kemper then, unless you stop using RM altogether. You've obviously got your reasons for doing this, but as an IT manager I can't think of any. In a few months Win7 joins XP in the graveyard.

    As a software engineer and a consumer, I've got a few reasons.... the biggest one is I don't like losing control over when my system gets updated by Microsoft, or over what they push onto my system without my knowledge or consent. My understanding is that is one of the things you give up by going to Windows 10.


    I have Windows 10 on my work computer, and it's a royal PITA because it's constantly hijacking my system, forcing me to shut down so it can do its updates when it wants to do them, instead of when it's convenient for me. And forget about opting out of any updates..... it's not an option without taking radical steps.... and maybe not even then. And as far as I can tell, I see nothing in it that is improved over Windows 7, at least for what I do. If anything, the damn security policies constantly popping up asking "Are you sure you want to allow this?" are annoying as f*ck!


    From what I understand, the only reason this is necessary is because Kemper decided to change their "signing partner" which resulted in a different certificate being required to run the newer builds of Rig Manager (there was nothing in the software itself that required it to be on a later version of Windows 7 or on Windows 10). I tried updating just the certificate manually, and I'm 99% sure I have the correct one on my system, but I still couldn't get RM to work.

  • You could also try updating .net framework manually if you havent already. Hey, you could even go through the win7 updates and check each update to see if its worth installing.


    Theres lists of patches that contain the backported telemetry updates that you can avoid (or uninstall).


    I moved off of win10 for similar reasons and I do miss the rig manager, but I find I spend more time with the profiles that i have, instead of auditioning new ones from the rig exchange.

  • As a software engineer and a consumer, I've got a few reasons.... the biggest one is I don't like losing control over when my system gets updated by Microsoft, or over what they push onto my system without my knowledge or consent. My understanding is that is one of the things you give up by going to Windows 10.


    I have Windows 10 on my work computer, and it's a royal PITA because it's constantly hijacking my system, forcing me to shut down so it can do its updates when it wants to do them, instead of when it's convenient for me. And forget about opting out of any updates..... it's not an option without taking radical steps.... and maybe not even then. And as far as I can tell, I see nothing in it that is improved over Windows 7, at least for what I do. If anything, the damn security policies constantly popping up asking "Are you sure you want to allow this?" are annoying as f*ck!


    From what I understand, the only reason this is necessary is because Kemper decided to change their "signing partner" which resulted in a different certificate being required to run the newer builds of Rig Manager (there was nothing in the software itself that required it to be on a later version of Windows 7 or on Windows 10). I tried updating just the certificate manually, and I'm 99% sure I have the correct one on my system, but I still couldn't get RM to work.

    Try this?


    https://www.windowscentral.com…-automatically-windows-10

  • As a software engineer and a consumer, I've got a few reasons.... the biggest one is I don't like losing control over when my system gets updated by Microsoft, or over what they push onto my system without my knowledge or consent. My understanding is that is one of the things you give up by going to Windows 10.


    From what I understand, the only reason this is necessary is because Kemper decided to change their "signing partner" which resulted in a different certificate being required to run the newer builds of Rig Manager (there was nothing in the software itself that required it to be on a later version of Windows 7 or on Windows 10). I tried updating just the certificate manually, and I'm 99% sure I have the correct one on my system, but I still couldn't get RM to work.

    The reason why this changes is that Microsoft does not longer allow driver signing with SHA1 (which is considered to be "broken"). The new certificates (that are also valid for just a limited time) are SHA256 certificates and - like before - the driver must be signed by us and signed by Microsoft, including a timestamp.


    So there is no possibility to create new driver packages without the SHA256 way.


    Windows 7 did not support SHA256 in the first place, it needs a specific update to support SHA256 for kernel drivers. Usually, this is already installed since 3 years, when auto update is enabled. This is something, I would recommend.

    In case users are picky with the updates, they usually deny the update. In this case, the specific update needs to be installed.


    You can find more information about this issue here:


    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-…tyadvisories/2015/3033929


    After installing this specific update, Windows 7 is able to run Rig Manager 2.3.

  • As a software engineer and a consumer, I've got a few reasons....

    I've been slinging code for a living (MS technologies) since '89 and feel as strongly as you do about automatic updates. In the early days, you couldn't disable them on 10 but the guys here pointed me to a link similar to the one above and I can verify that yes, you can completely disable automatic updates on 10.


    I still disagree with the decision that the new RM under development will require 10, as my studio system runs 7 and I have no compelling reason to change that. So, in order to get the new RM I'll have to run it from a 10 laptop, which is a clumsy solution. But, as you well know, developers hate backward compatibility, so my lone voice in the wilderness isn't going to change their minds.


    I will, however, run that update to enable the SHA256 as I didn't realize that was keeping me from getting RM 2.3 (although my 2.1x version works just fine). Thanks for the link, Timo!

    In a few months Win7 joins XP in the graveyard.

    No disrespect intended, but you say that like the OS will suddenly stop working.


    All it means is that MS will no longer be putting out updates for it (which often cause as much chaos as they prevent). I've been running unpatched 7 systems for years with zero ill effect. When there's an issue, I look up the KB and install that specific update. When the day comes that a driver or some other such thing is required that isn't available on 7 it will be an issue and I'll either upgrade or just use a different box. As long as your software runs on it, there is nothing wrong with using an OS that's "no longer supported." Unless you own MS stock, of course. :)

  • I don't like losing control over when my system gets updated by Microsoft, or over what they push onto my system without my knowledge or consent. My understanding is that is one of the things you give up by going to Windows 10.

    Another option would be this:
    http://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10


    I moved off of win10 for similar reasons and I do miss the rig manager, but I find I spend more time with the profiles that i have, instead of auditioning new ones from the rig exchange.

    The Editor would be something different tho, and W10 will be required... :/


    Windows 7 did not support SHA256 in the first place, it needs a specific update to support SHA256 for kernel drivers. Usually, this is already installed since 3 years, when auto update is enabled. This is something, I would recommend.
    After installing this specific update, Windows 7 is able to run Rig Manager 2.3.

    thanks timo! Would this work for the Editor (RM 3.o?) as well?


    as you well know, developers hate backward compatibility, so my lone voice in the wilderness isn't going to change their minds.


    Ha! TBH, I believe we are in the thousands :cursing:

  • As long as your software runs on it, there is nothing wrong with using an OS that's "no longer supported." Unless you own MS stock, of course. :)

    I actually have an old desktop system that I still use sporadically that runs Win98SE just fine. We have a desktop system at work running XP and another running Win NT. The NT system has ancient manufacturer proprietary software that we use to log into their equally ancient hardware that we still use. The software will not load or run on Win7 or Win10 systems. As you say, as long as your software runs it's all good. The NT system actually has a sticker on the front dated 1999 that certifies it as Y2K compliant and it was quite a few years old at that time.

  • My point of view is admittedly from a business and ICT security perspective. I need to make sure we walk the fine line between cutting edge applications and the ever- present threat of exploit or data loss. Plus I'd never be able to take a cavalier approach to OS support.


    It's a bit tricky to deploy Office 365 with Dynamics on old machines and some things just won't work properly.


    For home/studio it doesn't matter. You're unlikely to suffer an IT audit and have to explain why you're allowing unpatched software that's about to go end of extended support. Different strokes.