• I've gone sort of full circle on morphing. I set up different types of morphing when I first got it, but I was always forgetting which profiles had what in the heat of battle. Then I went to just setting all of them to just add a bit of extra volume, but it's a lot of work setting them all up.


    Now I use a separate performance slot for each sound I want, with effects as I want them. Except wah - that's a dedicated expression pedal and slot A locked.

  • I've gone sort of full circle on morphing. I set up different types of morphing when I first got it, but I was always forgetting which profiles had what in the heat of battle. Then I went to just setting all of them to just add a bit of extra volume, but it's a lot of work setting them all up.


    Now I use a separate performance slot for each sound I want, with effects as I want them. Except wah - that's a dedicated expression pedal and slot A locked.

    Good point - I tend to use morphing to switch more than one effect on/off at once: e.g. chorus + delay and the occasional gain adjustment.

  • I guess it depends on complexity. My sounds are pretty simple and I use morph just to add " a bit extra"....to make it go to 11 ( in the immortal words of spinal tap).


    So, I have separte basic sounds ( clean, rhythm, solo) each with morph for additonal changes. On solo passages are slower so I use it to have a bit more delay and reverb, on rhythm, I boost a bit for riffs.

  • Right now, I tend to use morphing to make a part jump out for the short time needed. I recently used it to add a harmonizer effect to a two bar phrase, set as a momentary switch. Seemed to work really well.

    “Without music, life would be a mistake.” - Friedrich Nietzsche