Kone & Kabinet Q&A

  • does anyone know what the Kabinet is made of it’s pretty light


    it sounds great , but I need to be able to switch the imprints per performance slot


    I'd love to know as well.


    You can't switch speakers per performance slot/rig? I had saved up a small fund to get myself a Kabinet, but I think I'll wait a while longer.


    What would be mind blowing is if someone with a V30 or a EVM12L or whatever does comparison videos of the actual thing versus the imprints. I would be very interested in that.


    To my mind though, the Kabinet seems superb and a big win if you have a Kemper. I almost spent the same amount as the entire cabinet on just a single EVM12L.

  • Well the Celestion F12-X20 manages to be FRFR as advertised, as a single midbass with a whizzer style setup.

    As a matter of fact, the term full range is used in two different ways.

    The proper use of the term relates to full audio range (that is, the theoretical 20-20k: the whole range pure audio exists within). In fact, the term FRFR usually identifies a cab gifted with at least a mid-woofer and a tweeter.

    Whining from electric guitar players about how "harsh" a tweeter is (it's not) brought developers to design cabs with no tweeter, but with a single mid-woofer with a broader band and a flatter response than a guitar-oriented mid-woofer. These speakers are called full range as well, but are not designed/able to be 20-20k within a reasonably small amount of dBs; it would be more correct to define them GRFR (guitar-range).

    At the state of the technique and AFAIK, there's no single FRFR speaker in the more proper sense. The Kone is no exception, and the fact it renders the CITR tone comes, among other things, from its limited band.



    Are the Kone imprints audible in the headphone output?

    No, Monitor Out only.

  • ckemper


    I got a question: owning an unpowered rack version of the KPA and wanting to purchase a Kabinet I now see several options:


    a) trading unpowered rack for powered rack, buy the Kabinet

    b) buy an external power amp, buy the Kabinet

    c) wait for a potential powered / active version of the Kabinet.


    With regard to options a) vs. b) I wonder if there is any „advantage“ sound-wise that the powered KPA has over an external power amp. Is the Kabinet tuned somehow to the parameters of the Kemper power amp or is it really that „generic“?


    Thank you in advance.

  • As a matter of fact, the term full range is used in two different ways.

    The proper use of the term relates to full audio range (that is, the theoretical 20-20k: the whole range pure audio exists within). In fact, the term FRFR usually identifies a cab gifted with at least a mid-woofer and a tweeter.

    Whining from electric guitar players about how "harsh" a tweeter is (it's not) brought developers to design cabs with no tweeter, but with a single mid-woofer with a broader band and a flatter response than a guitar-oriented mid-woofer. These speakers are called full range as well, but are not designed/able to be 20-20k within a reasonably small amount of dBs; it would be more correct to define them GRFR (guitar-range).

    At the state of the technique and AFAIK, there's no single FRFR speaker in the more proper sense. The Kone is no exception, and the fact it renders the CITR tone comes, among other things, from its limited band.

    Either way, they both sound great with their respective applications. I tried the KONE to get the full impact of the Kempers new FW. The imprints are more pleasing my overall playing experience. That being said, I easily could have lived with the X200 and the Camplifier setup. You're at the mercy of the quality of the IR being used, just like with any other modeler. The X200 translates that very well.


  • Let me intervene here.

    You are cementing pure marketing terms like FRFR and GRFR by assigning them to technologies.


    I am not aware that companies turned their back on tweeters because guitarists feel they are harsh.


    FRFR is a stupid marketing term made by Yamaha AFAIK, and unfortunately taken on and missapprehended by the guitarist audience as a full range speaker dedicated for guitarists. A good example is the Headrush (InMusic) taking an of-the shelf PA/Monitor speaker and relabeling it to FRFR, to catch the attention of guitarists. Incredible.


    As a result, a majority of guitarists believe that FRFR is different to fullrange, and that FRFR is more linear or more fullrange than what is called fullrange.


    GRFR is on top of that. "Guitar Frequency Full Responce" does not make too much sense.


    A broadband speaker can offer a different radiation pattern and thus sound more appealing for playing guitar, as the pattern is closer to a classic guitar speaker. (Broadband means a speaker without tweeter. (Fullrange is an independent term)

    However, the radiation pattern of broadband speakers with whizzer cone (such as ours, or from RedSound) is not really different to existing two-way speakers that are marketed to guitarists.




    "At the state of the technique and AFAIK, there's no single FRFR speaker in the more proper sense."


    Saying that de-facto there is no FRFR speaker out there shows the absurd aspect of this name and its false interpretation. What is the definition of FRFR and who has defined it? Is there Full Range speakers out there with no Flat Responce? Or Flat Responce Speakers without Full Range?


    "The Kone is no exception, and the fact it renders the CITR tone comes, among other things, from its limited band."


    How do you get to this conclusion?



    Talking about full range. Guitarists play a number of excellent fullrange speakers. Among them the Atomic CLR or the RCF NX-10. They offer a very flat frequency responce, beside the fact that the bass and treble can be emphasized to a certain degree to make the sound more pleasant.

    You can adjust this behaviour with your Kabinet or Kone by using the "Sweetening" control.


    CK