For Live gigs... if the Kemper goes down... what do you have as a backup? I am thinking Atomic Amplifire box...

  • NUX Mighty plug :)

    Kemper PowerRack | Rivera 4x12 V30 cab | Yamaha DXR10 pair | UA Apollo Twin Duo | Adam A7X | Cubase DAW
    Fender Telecaster 62 re-issue chambered mahogany | Kramer! (1988 or so...) | Gibson Les Paul R7 | Fender Stratocaster HBS-1 Classic Relic Custom Shop | LTD EC-1000 Evertune

  • I have a small pedal board that has a Sans Amp, delay and tuner for backup. So far never needed but nice to know it’s there.


    I would recommend that you actually use your backup in a band practice to test and see if it meets your needs

  • The Atomic A3 is my backup. Fortunately I have not had to use it but it does sound good. I also had a Tech21 RK5 which sounded good too.

    Rik


    Kemper toaster >Kemper remote> 2 x Alto TS310 powered speakers Furman M-8XAR

  • An acoustic guitar. :)


    Of course, I still have my old warhorse, a Rocktron Voodu Valve, which is also MIDI controllable. Mostly, though, I just try to avoid antagonizing whatever deity is in charge of luck.

  • An acoustic guitar. :)


    Of course, I still have my old warhorse, a Rocktron Voodu Valve, which is also MIDI controllable. Mostly, though, I just try to avoid antagonizing whatever deity is in charge of luck.

    In the later 90's I traded my ADA MP1 for one of those. It was a big upgrade because it had effects and I got compliments on the sound even though I didn't think it was super good. That was the device that had all these fancy parameters to set and then I'd see a guy with an amp with 4 knobs have a better sound. And that learning experience is what made me buy a Kemper over an AX FX. Although I'm not afraid of MIDI and understand super complicated editing, I just want to turn something on and have it be great. Too many choices is bad for me. I love the level of editing allowed with the Kemper, it enough but not too much it's really made to tweek the snapshot rather than create something.

  • There are usually a bunch of backline amps and stuff at most important concerts that could be used in case the Kemper goes wrong so I never bring a backup. Besides, I know of Murphy's Law and all but in 5 years of everyday use of the Kemper, it never just "stopped working" all of a sudden. There has been a few crashes and reboots maybe, a non critical hardware issue as well but not a full stop "I suddenly can't use it anymore." So statistically, 0 occurrences in 1825 days. Do what you will with those odds but imo there are more important things to worry about before a gig. If something goes wrong with Kemper say the week before the show and it needs repair, I do have a large pedalboard (containing an Atomic Amplifier 3) that does the job just as well.

  • In the later 90's I traded my ADA MP1 for one of those. It was a big upgrade because it had effects and I got compliments on the sound even though I didn't think it was super good. That was the device that had all these fancy parameters to set and then I'd see a guy with an amp with 4 knobs have a better sound. And that learning experience is what made me buy a Kemper over an AX FX. Although I'm not afraid of MIDI and understand super complicated editing, I just want to turn something on and have it be great. Too many choices is bad for me. I love the level of editing allowed with the Kemper, it enough but not too much it's really made to tweek the snapshot rather than create something.

    I ended up with a Kemper from similar motivations, not so much the complexities (plenty of complexity in the Kemper if you want to do a deep dive) but the fact that I'm not good at dialing in tones and don't enjoy the experience. Now it's just pick a profile, rock and roll.


    However, at the time that I was gigging with the Voodu, the digital stuff wasn't really there yet tone-wise (at least for me), but I wanted the ability to step on a button and go from Eddie melting glass to Bonnie Raitt, and all points in between. The Voodu has a 12ax7 tube in the pre, so I was able to get tones that sounded authentic to me, and then I could simply assign a MIDI program number to it. Whether it was a normal amp or the Voodu, I was stuck trying to get my own tones either way, so this at least afforded me more flexibility than I could get with my Marshall.


    Maybe that's why a week after buying the Kemper when I sold all my amps I still kept the Voodu, because it's my failsafe. I don't think it sounds as good as the Kemper but it is, quite literally, close enough for rock and roll.

  • I ended up with a Kemper from similar motivations, not so much the complexities (plenty of complexity in the Kemper if you want to do a deep dive) but the fact that I'm not good at dialing in tones and don't enjoy the experience. Now it's just pick a profile, rock and roll.


    However, at the time that I was gigging with the Voodu, the digital stuff wasn't really there yet tone-wise (at least for me), but I wanted the ability to step on a button and go from Eddie melting glass to Bonnie Raitt, and all points in between. The Voodu has a 12ax7 tube in the pre, so I was able to get tones that sounded authentic to me, and then I could simply assign a MIDI program number to it. Whether it was a normal amp or the Voodu, I was stuck trying to get my own tones either way, so this at least afforded me more flexibility than I could get with my Marshall.


    Maybe that's why a week after buying the Kemper when I sold all my amps I still kept the Voodu, because it's my failsafe. I don't think it sounds as good as the Kemper but it is, quite literally, close enough for rock and roll.

    I did the same thing. Not right away, only after I was convinced the Kemper could replicate those amps perfectly. I sold everything except my vintage stuff that I wouldn't gig with anyway . EVH 5153, ENGL Morse, Blackstar, Fender SE HRDIII, all went bye bye. ( Although I liked it the least of all, the HRD III would do some tones that are very difficult to get with other amps. Mine would NAIL the tone from RUSH "Limelight" with my 335!)

    I kept my GSP1101 and a Rocktron poweramp for a backup with control2 if my Kemper might be down until I replaced it or had it repaired, and my trusty spyder I pray I never have to use that goes with me to every show. I'd say the Kemper has been a boon to people investing in tube amps Kemper users sell off.. I still love them and love playing them, but I just cannot see why I would ever go back to them.

  • having 2 or 3 of everything is vitally important to a working musician.


    With my current rig (which consists solely of a modeler), I have often thought that maybe it would be good if they created a companion device....

    I can do all of my work on the "big daddy" product at home. Do all of my tweaks. Make everything perfect during the week at my leisure.

    And then, for showtime, all I need is a device that lets me upload my patches. When I am on a stage, it is too late to adjust tone. All I need is the tuner, the expression pedal, and a method to change patches. I do not need all of the editing buttons and functionality.


    I'd rather have one "big daddy" product I leave at home, and two $100 companion devices for gigs.

    As it stands now, I have a big piece of plexiglass that goes over the screen and knobs. Prevents the screen from breaking if something drops on it. Prevents the knobs from being accidentally moved. I know some people who put a "rain jacket" over their board to keep puke and beer from finding its way into electronics.

    I don't own a Kemper but was here investigating. If I answer a post, it is based on general knowledge - not on Kemper experience.

  • There are usually a bunch of backline amps and stuff at most important concerts that could be used in case the Kemper goes wrong so I never bring a backup. Besides, I know of Murphy's Law and all but in 5 years of everyday use of the Kemper, it never just "stopped working" all of a sudden. There has been a few crashes and reboots maybe, a non critical hardware issue as well but not a full stop "I suddenly can't use it anymore." So statistically, 0 occurrences in 1825 days. Do what you will with those odds but imo there are more important things to worry about before a gig. If something goes wrong with Kemper say the week before the show and it needs repair, I do have a large pedalboard (containing an Atomic Amplifier 3) that does the job just as well.

    It all depends on where you are on the food chain, it all starts getting like it when you already play in middle band festivals. Most of the concerts I went, the only alternative was asking for someone to lend you their amp for the night. No backline whatsoever. I believe that things like the HX stomp will fast become the backline for many guitar players. The size and relative quality to it are genious.

  • I believe that things like the HX stomp will fast become the backline for many guitar players. The size and relative quality to it are genious.

    I recently got an HX Stomp and it's perfect for this purpose. It led me to buy an FM3 though, too, so should probably come with a warning :D

    (Kemper is still king of my hill)

  • I asked the same question ages ago and some “old-time” members (long-term subscribers, not ageing rockers) recommended the atomic Amplifire to me. The AA3 was newish and the only AA model in production at the time. I got one after not enjoying a line6 product at that time and it was an instant hit -great sound and an effective alternative to the kpa. The other reason was it was an ideal fly-gig-rig. Small and compact too. I rely on it when my kpa is not a practical solution.

    You should be able to pick up a used AA3 for a good price nowadays, though like me, you may prefer the extra buttons of the bigger models.

    Maybe if the kemper stage was around a few years ago i’d have gone for that but at half the price the AA12 was ideal.

    Check out some demos but, like any modeller, it can sound as bad as it does good depending how it's set up and who is using it.

  • Small not-so-off-topic question:


    ¿Is someone actually gigging? like, not online concerts or local bars with safety and health measures, but actual gigging. This is still pretty sad for musicians over here.

  • Small not-so-off-topic question:


    ¿Is someone actually gigging? like, not online concerts or local bars with safety and health measures, but actual gigging. This is still pretty sad for musicians over here.

    Friends of mine who play in cover bands are now using pub car parks to play in the UK.