What setting do I use for my DAW with Kemper? 44100 or 48000 or higher?

  • And if I use 48k or higher, do I have to change that setting in the profiler? Is the standard 44.1 good enough for recordings to Itunes, Spotify, etc.?


    The higher the sample rate then the lower the latency- if I choose not to do direct monitoring, according to what my DAW is reporting.

  • Hi, BayouTexan.

    And if I use 48k or higher, do I have to change that setting in the profiler?



    From the Kemper Manual.


    Change the S/PDIF values in the Output Section.




    Is the standard 44.1 good enough for recordings to Itunes, Spotify, etc.?


    Let's see what others here have to say.


    The higher the sample rate then the lower the latency- if I choose not to do direct monitoring, according to what my DAW is reporting.


    What DAW are you using? Can you give us a quote to what you've said above?


    What interface are you using?


    ST

  • Kemper (main TS stereo outs)--->Motu M4 (TS inputs 3 and 4)--->Reaper 5(Win 7 64b)


    Reported via Reaper:

    44.1kHz 24bit WAV: 4/4ch 32 spls ~1.3/3.8ms ASIO

    48kHz 24bit WAV: 4/4ch 32 spls ~1.2/3.5ms ASIO

    88.2kHz 24bit WAV: 4/4ch 32 spls ~0.7/2.7ms ASIO

    96kHz 24bit WAV: 4/4ch 32 spls ~0.6/2.4 ms ASIO

    etc.


    As you can see, the higher the sample rate then the lower the latency (direct monitor OFF). I've tried both 44.1 and 48 at 32 samples and get no notifiable artifacts using my monitors, however, I did not do any critical recorded playback with headphones to check if there is any artifacting.


    I would like to make recordings clean and pristine. I don't plan on using any post-processing on the guitar tracks except for maybe HP and LP filters and EQ for mixing with other tracks, and a special Stereo Widener plugin I love. I am still relatively new to DAW recording. I like to listen to the actual processed signal while playing/practicing.

  • Hi, BayouTexan.


    Since you are running analogue from the Profiler (Master Outputs), you are not using the Profiler digital outputs. The S/PDIF settings on the Profiler aren't relevant.

    I thought so, but was not sure. I went and set the SPDIF in the profiler to 48k anyway in case I eventually upgrade to SPDIF. Thanks!


    and 48k seems to be the new norm.

  • Is the standard 44.1 good enough for recordings to Itunes, Spotify, etc.?

    100% yes!


    This is a rabbit hole I'm not willing to venture down anymore. Plenty of seemingly-endless threads on this in audio-gear forums, GearSlutz being a prime example.

    48k seems to be the new norm

    For those working for / to picture, yes. For the rest of us, 44.1kHz is still the agreed-upon norm.


    The subtle benefits of working at 88/96kHz and beyond aren't worth the CPU hit IMHO.

  • If you have the patience to listen, then watch the videos. Even if you don't understand everything, it will give you a basis to make the decision:


    https://www.xiph.org/video/


    You will be disappointed at all the times you watched your computer falling over on a big mix at 96k!


    Obviously, skip the video stuff.

  • To be fair, one of, if not the major issue for folks pushing the 2x SR thing is aliasing "reflected" down the frequency spectrum from the brick-wall filter. The higher the SR, the more this "gunk" is shifted into the ultrasonic realm 'cause said filter operates at a progressively-higher cutoff point.


    That said, even at 44.1kHz, the aliasing bumps tend to peak roughly around -80dB IIRC, which is why I said in post #6 that IMHO the benefits are "subtle"... 'cause they are, no matter how you slice it.


    Will's pro buddies likely operate in a sphere way above yours or mine facility and budget-wise. If farming out DSP and spending orders of magnitude more than you or I do on computers, storage, preamps, room treatment and monitoring were options, then sure, I reckon most "lowly" folks would shift up to 2x rates, especially as the clientele would expect it. Different league IMHO, and one where much investment is made far beyond points of diminishing returns when "normal" folks would've quit long ago.


    Hopefully this illustrates why I answered BT the way I did. Each of us has to know where to draw the line, after all, as Clint Eastwood so-eloquently reminded us back in the day.

  • Certain artists like to see you using 96k, that's for sure. The only thing I ever thought was a possible benefit is that plugins are supposed to work better at high sample rates. I would be hard pushed to tell you in a blind test though.


    I have a Pro Tools HD rig with 3 cards and mixes with 120 tracks are really on the edge if you are using plugins too. We end up sub mixing backing vocals to free up processing power, or run from multiple drives..

  • It's all going to play through an iPhone anyway, so no worry ;)

    Recording in 44.1k and 24bit for audio is still fine IMO and master it to 44.1k and 16bit.
    This file format is supported on every platform and no unwanted conversion is done on their/other platforms.

  • I don't think there are any compelling reasons to go back to 16bit for recording purposes; the 144dB of dynamic range that 24bit recording offers, vs 96dB for 16bit dramatically improves the signal to noise ratio and lessens the requirement to drive inputs near the maximum threshold and risk clipping a good take. The cumulative reduction in noise over multiple tracks is beneficial across budget and pro audio interfaces alike and presents more noticeable, audible improvements than say, doubling sample rate.

  • I don't think there are any compelling reasons to go back to 16bit for recording purposes; the 144dB of dynamic range that 24bit recording offers, vs 96dB for 16bit dramatically improves the signal to noise ratio and lessens the requirement to drive inputs near the maximum threshold and risk clipping a good take. The cumulative reduction in noise over multiple tracks is beneficial across budget and pro audio interfaces alike and presents more noticeable, audible improvements than say, doubling sample rate.

    I would agree with you and record at 24bit, but I was surprised it just gives you a little more leeway with the noise floor.