Stereo recording

  • Hi,

    Kemper offers to record instrument in line stereo or mono for your choice. But. What the reason to record stereo in line?


    If I'm not wrong, the reason to record stereo it's, for example, different mics, different location of mics, some natural delay of recording sound, wich is desirable, etc.

    And if I will record stereo in line, won't it be the same 2 tracks with no difference?


    So, again. What the reason to record stereo with Kemper? :)

  • Effects after the stack section can all be stereo. Ping pong delays, choruses, reverbs etc. Does that help?

    Kemper PowerRack | Rivera 4x12 V30 cab | Yamaha DXR10 pair | UA Apollo Twin Duo | Adam A7X | Cubase DAW
    Fender Telecaster 62 re-issue chambered mahogany | Kramer! (1988 or so...) | Gibson Les Paul R7 | Fender Stratocaster HBS-1 Classic Relic Custom Shop | LTD EC-1000 Evertune

  • Effects after the stack section can all be stereo. Ping pong delays, choruses, reverbs etc. Does that help?

    So, that is only reason, why should we record in line stereo? If I don't use any of this effects, I will not have any differences between stereo or mono recordings. Right?

  • Correct. I also rarely record stereo as all stereo effects are added in DAW. I do record the full signal for my YouTube videos etc. where I don't do any post-processing.

    Kemper PowerRack | Rivera 4x12 V30 cab | Yamaha DXR10 pair | UA Apollo Twin Duo | Adam A7X | Cubase DAW
    Fender Telecaster 62 re-issue chambered mahogany | Kramer! (1988 or so...) | Gibson Les Paul R7 | Fender Stratocaster HBS-1 Classic Relic Custom Shop | LTD EC-1000 Evertune

  • I usually spurn stereo guitar (especially live, I just don't see the point as I want everyone to hear the same thing) But for some reason when I record the Kemper it just sounds better when using master stereo outs vs master mono. Even if I pan the FX straight up as I do, it seems bigger. It may be in my head but I haven't really picked it apart and A/B'd them. It's easy to record stereo so I do.

  • Recording in stereo allows you to manipulate the guitar placement in a stereo field. You might not want the guitar at dead center (mono) at times especially for certain drum licks and when vocals are centered. Panning hard left or hard right can sometimes "separate" the mix to much in a song. Just depends on what you want. I always record in stereo then adjust panning according to the mix.

  • I rarely, if ever, record a single guitar in stereo, primarily because I don't record with any effects after the amp (or model/profile). That is all done in the DAW with plugins. I do, however, layer guitars and pan the groups a bit, but never hard left or right.

  • Remember, EVH panned hard left (or right depending on which way you sat, or stood, or stand). ;)

    The early albums were mixed specifically to make his guitar stand out. That's not something that I want in the stuff that I do, I utilize a lot more instrumentation (I'm also a keyboard player, started on that years before picking up the guitar).

  • Recording in stereo allows you to manipulate the guitar placement in a stereo field. You might not want the guitar at dead center (mono) at times especially for certain drum licks and when vocals are centered. Panning hard left or hard right can sometimes "separate" the mix to much in a song. Just depends on what you want. I always record in stereo then adjust panning according to the mix.

    You can of course also pan a mono signal.

    Kemper PowerRack | Rivera 4x12 V30 cab | Yamaha DXR10 pair | UA Apollo Twin Duo | Adam A7X | Cubase DAW
    Fender Telecaster 62 re-issue chambered mahogany | Kramer! (1988 or so...) | Gibson Les Paul R7 | Fender Stratocaster HBS-1 Classic Relic Custom Shop | LTD EC-1000 Evertune

  • Remember, EVH panned hard left (or right depending on which way you sat, or stood, or stand). ;)

    Eddie didn't. The Producer and engineer did. He disliked it and it is a testimony to why I don't like stereo live. Sometimes one half of the room doesn't get to hear some things. Ever hear a VH song where the place had stereo split up very wide across the building or had one set of speakers not working? During solos you just heard drums and bass.

  • I usually spurn stereo guitar (especially live, I just don't see the point as I want everyone to hear the same thing) But for some reason when I record the Kemper it just sounds better when using master stereo outs vs master mono. Even if I pan the FX straight up as I do, it seems bigger. It may be in my head but I haven't really picked it apart and A/B'd them. It's easy to record stereo so I do.

    that’s probably just the added level from two signals. Have you checked it with both mono and stereo carefully level matched?

  • Recording in stereo allows you to manipulate the guitar placement in a stereo field. You might not want the guitar at dead center (mono) at times especially for certain drum licks and when vocals are centered. Panning hard left or hard right can sometimes "separate" the mix to much in a song. Just depends on what you want. I always record in stereo then adjust panning according to the mix.

    as musicmad said, stereo panning in a mix works just the same with a mono signal from the Kemper. This is exactly the same as recording a analog amp with mics. The mics are typically grouped to a single mono bus which can be panned anywhere in the mix.