Double Tracker

  • I've had the 'dropouts' consistently too. I don't know if it's noticeable to those listening but I definitely feel it when playing. However, it only catches my attention when playing at home, with the band playing i don't notice it.


    However....... I surprised myself at how much I committed to using it live. I've never been a believer in the benefits of playing in stereo with a band, so didn't expect me to adopt it so thoroughly. It sounds marvellous through IEMs but at band practices, we often just plug the bass, vocals and Kemper into the PA at the rehearsal space. The cabs are widely spread and the DT sounds really good alone but when the bands gets excited, the guitar loses clarity and punch and disappears. Everyone in the band agrees.


    We're a 3 piece rock band, a little energetic and hard edged and I'd persuaded myself that the double tracker would make us sound bigger live, even when all my previous experiences suggested otherwise.


    Tonight, I've removed the double tracker from all my performances. It's a great feature and through no fault of its own it takes far more than it gives.


    Happily back with mono guitar with the odd stereo delay for fun.

  • I started experimenting with triple double trackers at once. Kemper DT + Mimiq + Waves DT. I like it! Never had drop-outs even when using one.

    The more you find what Kemper can do then the harder you try to find what it cannot do -- like make a good cup of Frappuccino.

  • For yesterday's rehearsal I copied all my performances and removed the DoubleTracker there.

    Instead, I added a subtle reverb to any rig that was previously dry.

    I was excited because switching between rigs feels so much better now. No more dorpouts and I no longer feel like I switched rigs at the wrong time. Of course it was a lot of fun to hear the guitar with the DT like a wall on both sides and it definitely cleaned up the sound when rehearsing via in-ears, but the playing feel is now much better without this FX.

    The DoubleTracker is now disappearing from my rigs again.

    It's a shame that the Mimiq doubler made such a noticeable cracking noise in my FX loop, otherwise that would have been an option.

  • For yesterday's rehearsal I copied all my performances and removed the DoubleTracker there.

    Instead, I added a subtle reverb to any rig that was previously dry.

    I was excited because switching between rigs feels so much better now. No more dorpouts and I no longer feel like I switched rigs at the wrong time. Of course it was a lot of fun to hear the guitar with the DT like a wall on both sides and it definitely cleaned up the sound when rehearsing via in-ears, but the playing feel is now much better without this FX.

    The DoubleTracker is now disappearing from my rigs again.

    It's a shame that the Mimiq doubler made such a noticeable cracking noise in my FX loop, otherwise that would have been an option.

    I did the same.
    I tried DT on an entire show, was really great for in ears but felt really strange to play at high volume and not that great in my opinion. Was loosing a lot of dynamic and feel.

  • ...

    It's a shame that the Mimiq doubler made such a noticeable cracking noise in my FX loop, otherwise that would have been an option.

    I have been using the Stereo Mimiq after the Main Outs with good results. Have you tried that?

    The more you find what Kemper can do then the harder you try to find what it cannot do -- like make a good cup of Frappuccino.

  • Yes, but the Mimiq does something weird with the stereo signal:
    when I (at least on my device) go into the Mimiq with a stereo delay,
    it seems to internally convert it to mono and then apply the doubler effect.
    So the delay sounds completely different than if I first went into the Mimiq and then into the delay.

  • Yes, but the Mimiq does something weird with the stereo signal:
    when I (at least on my device) go into the Mimiq with a stereo delay,
    it seems to internally convert it to mono and then apply the doubler effect.
    So the delay sounds completely different than if I first went into the Mimiq and then into the delay.

    I am not having that issue. If I don't want the Kemper delay or reverb (or other effect) to be doubled then I have to use a delay and/or verb plugin in DAW to center back those effects since the doubler will widen them. Kind of sounds like you are getting the opposite effect from me. You do have the Stereo Mimiq with L and R input/outputs? Because TCE sells a mono version (which is pretty useless in my opinion).


    The more you find what Kemper can do then the harder you try to find what it cannot do -- like make a good cup of Frappuccino.

    Edited once, last by BayouTexan ().

  • I forget exactly why, but I had the stereo mimic and it didn't work right. I tried it in the loop and after the main outputs but I was never satisfied.


    If I recall correctly, it worked best after the main outputs but it didn't want to have the mimic and all the cables needed on the stage floor and it definitely didn't sound right on all the time so needed to be able to switch it on and off.


    I'm not doubting that it sounded fun, but for recording I would always double track for real and live it wasn't working for me. It just became a cute toy for practicing and so I moved on.


    The Kemper DT was actually better for me in terms of control but i just find that a double tracked sound is not usable in a live band situation for how I play.

  • ....You do have the Stereo Mimiq with L and R input/outputs? ....

    Yes, it's the stereo Mimiq.

    In the past I used to have the Mimiq on my pedalboard and ran it in front of two amps (or later two Nux Solid Studio IR & Pow Amp Sim).

    With the guitar I went mono into the Mimiq, stereo into the delay and from there into the amps.

    The delay sound was changed slightly because I went in with a stereo signal, but it also had something "three-dimensional" about it, which was kind of funny.


    Because I wasn't quite sure right now, I made a short video:

    As you can see, in the first part of the video, the Mimiq hangs in stereo on the main outs of the Kemper and it goes stereo to the audio interface.

    I used a simple ping-pong delay as a preset. If I turn on the Mimiq, it seems to internally convert it to mono and then adds the doubler effect. But that's no longer a ping-pong.

    If I connect the Mimiq to the FX loop, I have the FX like I used to have with two amps, but I have an unpleasant crackling sound when switching between two identical rigs. If I turn the Rig-X-Fade Time up to 10 ms, the crackling disappears almost completely, but the Rig becomes quieter for a short time, almost like the Kemper DoubleTracker. I was in contact with the Kemper support last year, but they could not reproduce the behavior. Even connecting an isolating transformer between the FX loop and the Mimiq was unsuccessful.


    It would have been nice to have this feature, but it's not a total bad thing to not being able to use the DoubleTracker.

    Therefore the Kemper offers enough other advantages.

  • I don't have my Mimiq parameters that high. I have Tightness at about 2 o'clock and Effect and Dry near 12 o'clock. My dubs are set at 2. Try my settings and use dubs at 1 or 2 to see if ping pong stays more apart. I find the closer the knobs go halfway then the more drastic the Mimiq gets. I think you also get a gain boost when turning up the Dry knob. See if the crackling goes away when you dial Dry to Zero then raise until the crackling begins.


    BTW, I find that the Kemper DT works almost exactly like the Mimiq with all the Mimiq's Knobs at about 10 o'clock and Dubs at 1. I use Dual Delay sometimes with the DT's but no ping pong, both sides set the same time and I let the DT do the slight ping pong itself. Just my personal preference.

    The more you find what Kemper can do then the harder you try to find what it cannot do -- like make a good cup of Frappuccino.

  • I've tried your settings now and as I expected, I have no ping-pong delay (when I connect the Mimiq behind the mainouts ).

    Turning the Dry and Effect down (let's say 12 o'clock) just makes it quieter, but it stays mono with a DoubleTrack Effect.

    If I now turn down the effect signal on Dubs 1, then I have the dry "mono-ping-pong" on the right side.

    If I turn the effect signal up and turn the dry signal all the way down, I have the effected "mono-ping-pong" on the left side.

    If I set dubs to 2, the dry signal all the way down, I have the effected "mono-ping-pong" on both sides. If I turn Dry up and Effect down, I have the "mono-ping-pong" in the middle.

    You can hear that very clearly on my recording: the Mimiq turns my stereo signal into a mono signal and simply adds the doubler effect.


    with the crackling in the FX loop:

    if I pull down dry, then of course I only have the doubler signal on the left side. That's not the effect I'd like to have.

  • I guess it seems sensible to tag this on here.

    I've been playing with headphones on and without a cab, double tracker sounds great.

    As soon as I turn the poweramp on the double tracker sounds so phased and just awful with the Kab.
    I can't be the only one that's heard this?
    Any remedies?


    For some context, I am trying to make my main riff performance sound thicker and beefier. If double tracker sounds bad through the cab I'm open for suggestions

  • I guess it seems sensible to tag this on here.

    I've been playing with headphones on and without a cab, double tracker sounds great.

    As soon as I turn the poweramp on the double tracker sounds so phased and just awful with the Kab.
    I can't be the only one that's heard this?
    Any remedies?


    For some context, I am trying to make my main riff performance sound thicker and beefier. If double tracker sounds bad through the cab I'm open for suggestions

    Just a guess, but the cab is mono? The double tracker isn’t build for mono operation.

    And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make.

  • You can use a double tracker for a mono signal to fatten up the guitar on a single track recorded in stereo when double tracking by hand. Confused? Do this... Track a stereo signal with the Kemper doubler. Pan the left hard left (or 60-88%-ish). Delete the right track. Then play another stereo track with the Kemper doubler and pan that hard right ( or 60- 88%-ish). Delete the left track. You can get a very pleasant and fat sound with this technique, and you are able to balance any db drops from one channel to the other--this seems to be a natural by-product of doubling digitally. I do this technique all the time and sometimes place a doubler plugin on top of those two channels to get even fatter. But too much fat can be hazardous. ;)

    Give it a try. Just watch your Cholesterol levels.

    The more you find what Kemper can do then the harder you try to find what it cannot do -- like make a good cup of Frappuccino.

  • When I recently woke up in the middle of the night and couldn't go back to sleep, I suddenly had a brainwave! I tried this early in the morning and it's embarrassing that I didn't think of it before:

    the right output of the Kemper goes directly into my audio interface as usual. The left output of the Kemper goes into the mono-in of the Mimiq Doubler and from there I go with the left output of the Mimiq (ie only the effected signal) into the interface!

    It actually sounds almost the same as it used to when I played over two amps in the past.

    In those days the Mimiq was always on. This of course slightly changed the character of the delay if I turned it on. But it was also kind of cool, there was something three dimensional about it...I thought then I could bypass the Mimiq with my G-Lab MIDI looper once I select a rig with a delay.

    But unfortunately I had a slight crackling in the signal again as soon as I switched from a delay rig back to a rig with the Mimiq in the output.

    I probably won't use it to play live, but it's fun for rehearsals!