Double Tracker

  • I would think this should only happen at stereo settings of >100%. Have you tried reducing the stereo field to 100% or less to see if the phase issue still exists?

    Happens even with a 100% stereo setting. But I'm wondering if there's some kind of bug with the beta.


    While I was playing later with the double tracker, I got a really exaggerated phasing sound while using the double tracker. It was just sweeping up and down every time I played. Haven't restarted the Kemper, but hopefully that will remove the issue.

  • Happens even with a 100% stereo setting. But I'm wondering if there's some kind of bug with the beta.


    While I was playing later with the double tracker, I got a really exaggerated phasing sound while using the double tracker. It was just sweeping up and down every time I played. Haven't restarted the Kemper, but hopefully that will remove the issue.

    Having had a Mimiq for some time, the minor phasing issue is a side effect that cannot be completely eradicated. I imagine there is a variable delay and pitch involved to create the illusion of double tracking.


    However, this is not a real problem when playing live and I would always double the part by playing twice in the studio.

  • Like the acoustic simulator, the double tracker is more a compromise solution for a live situation. Nice to have, but not totally convincing (when compared to real double tracking).

    Maybe I can use it for some experimental stuff as an "effect".

  • The double tracker has me rethinking my ideas about running stereo in a live setting. I can see using this in a solo project or when it's me with a rhythm section. My rehearsal setup is mono or stereo with a twist of a couple of pan controls. I had a ball with the double tracker for several hours yesterday. I'm wondering if I'm willing to run stereo live or run mono, but stereo in my in-ears.

  • Through studio monitors, the Double Tracker is pretty cool, but through in-ears, it really comes alive. I spent hours playing late last night through in-ears, and everytime I shut the DT off, the sound was so disappointing. Yes, it's not perfect, but as a guy who always plays in one guitar bands & who does no home recording, making my guitar sound literally like two guys has been extremely satisfying.

  • The double tracker has me rethinking my ideas about running stereo in a live setting. I can see using this in a solo project or when it's me with a rhythm section. My rehearsal setup is mono or stereo with a twist of a couple of pan controls. I had a ball with the double tracker for several hours yesterday. I'm wondering if I'm willing to run stereo live or run mono, but stereo in my in-ears.

    Me too. I have stereo amp and two Kabinets.

    Thing is it's a 2 guitar band though.

    No harm in trying it right? ;)

  • I have a similar problem. The volume in the right side drops periodically.


    Also, there is this weird "pulsating" sound. The left channel is completely normal.


    I think it is not original idea(intention) behind those volume drops. I belive it is a some kind of a a bug. ckemper

    would you please listen to this I don't think this is the intended effect - but if you can comment on it, it would be nice.

  • Me too. I have stereo amp and two Kabinets.

    Thing is it's a 2 guitar band though.

    No harm in trying it right? ;)

    A million years ago, I ran a separate stereo PA for my guitar. When I played, it sounded like the voice of the almighty. That didn't last long. It was just too much work, and I came to understand, it was a distraction from the song.


    When I had a two-guitar/vocalist band (basically a duo with a rhythm section), we ran mono. Our whole schtick was the interplay of vocals and guitar, back and forth, call and response, or guitar harmonies. Mono was the traditional PA setup.


    One day we set up our PA so you heard my vocals and guitar from stage right where I was standing, and you heard my buddy from stage left where he was standing. We got tonnes of feedback from our regulars. All of a sudden, there was a clear correlation between what they saw and what they heard. It was like they could follow the bouncing ball as we tossed it back and forth. They were finally in on the joke, and they loved it. We did that for years, and in the venues where we could use the PA to localize our positions in the sound field, it worked well for us, and we worked it hard.


    I bring the same mindset to a one-guitar band because I'm only in one spot on the stage. My sound doesn't need to be as wide as the stage or to appear to come from everywhere. But I'm rethinking this, not as a simulation of being twice as big, but trying to understand the rush of emotion I get when I kick in the double tracker. Lots to think about as I ponder how I'd use it.

  • That's what I like about the Bose L1 approach.

    I used to have a 3x12 with the 1x12 combo behind me (slightly stage right), and the 2x12 all the way stage left.

    Coverage was fabulous.

    What I'd like to do is run mono most of the time, and run stereo/Double track at the flip of a switch.

  • That's what I like about the Bose L1 approach.

    I used to have a 3x12 with the 1x12 combo behind me (slightly stage right), and the 2x12 all the way stage left.

    Coverage was fabulous.

    What I'd like to do is run mono most of the time, and run stereo/Double track at the flip of a switch.

    We used four Bose L1 systems in the band I described in the paragraph below. One for each performer.

    One day we set up our PA so you heard my vocals and guitar from stage right where I was standing, and you heard my buddy from stage left where he was standing. We got tonnes of feedback from our regulars. All of a sudden, there was a clear correlation between what they saw and what they heard. It was like they could follow the bouncing ball as we tossed it back and forth. They were finally in on the joke, and they loved it. We did that for years, and in the venues where we could use the PA to localize our positions in the sound field, it worked well for us, and we worked it hard.

  • You did the right thing with a 2 guitar setup. This would give you the double track effect that would disappear if you both played in stereo.


    Was the engineer responsible for panning if one of you ran across the stage though:-)

  • I can report today that using the default setting of looseness of 5.0 and no detune makes the effect work like it's intended to.


    This tool is great. I faux quad tracked. Just two takes, with the double tracker on each of them. Maybe I got lucky, but no weird volume drops or phasing.



    My guess is that something is going screwy when you move away from the default setting. It's a bug that needs fixing. But in the meantime, it pays to just try using this with the default setting.

  • Very excellent. After I make lunch, I'm going to try your advice with the settings. I was going with 0.0 loosesness & will try it at 5 & see how it goes. 🤘