Let's talk Stereo set up

  • Hi,


    I'm finally going to try a stereo setup (No external stereo effects just internal). I tried it after watching the Kemper tutorial video and something doesn't feel right. Here's a few questions I have.


    first off, I'm just using a light always on reverb and delay with the occasional slapback delay and one preset for ambient reverb.


    1) Will Stereo provide more depth to my tone?


    2)It's just stereo effects, not like running two live amps right? or is there a way to mimic what using two of the same amps on stage would be like?


    so now the set up process, correct me if I'm wrong..


    I selected master stereo in the output section. I connect two xls, left to input 1, right to input 2 on my interface. In Logic Pro X, I create two tracks and select Input for each one so they are record enabled, 1st one is panned hard left and 2nd track is panned hard right. Then I go into the reverb and delays and set them all to 200% stereo (not sure what -200% does or the significance of going to 200vs100%).


    3) is slapback delay something I should or shouldn't Stereo pan?


    The results...


    I think I hear what sounds like dual mono. Theres a weird phase thing going on or doubling sound. Not sure what I'm missing.


    `Guy

  • I would use a single stereo track in Logic rather than 2 mono. This affects panning differently although you can set the pan options to suit you needs.


    200% stereo should create a wider than real image. i believe this is done with some phase trickery which probably explains the phase sounds you are hearing. Go for 100% stereo.


  • Double Tracking or quad tracking will give you the depth. Try the Kemper Double Tracker in effects with the Chromatic Delay Double Tracker preset at about 12ms on one side and 0ms on the other.


    Of course, double tracking guitars without using DT effects will get you better results but Kemper will get you close for live use.


    Dual Amps with DAW: Record a stereo track and DI signal. Mute the right channel after recording. Then reamp your DI with another amp to a "new" right channel.

    The more you find what Kemper can do then the harder you try to find what it cannot do -- like make a good cup of Frappuccino.

    Edited once, last by BayouTexan ().

  • Double Tracking or quad tracking will give you the depth. Try the Kemper Double Tracker in effects with the Chromatic Delay Double Tracker preset at about 12ms on one side and 0ms on the other.


    Of course, double tracking guitars without using DT effects will get you better results but Kemper will get you close for live use.


    Dual Amps with DAW: Record a stereo track and DI signal. Mute the right channel after recording. Then reamp your DI with another amp to a "new" right channel.

    That's cool for recording purposes, just wasn't sure if a dual mono stereo setup would be more of a live application to dual amps.

  • I would use a single stereo track in Logic rather than 2 mono. This affects panning differently although you can set the pan options to suit you needs.


    200% stereo should create a wider than real image. i believe this is done with some phase trickery which probably explains the phase sounds you are hearing. Go for 100% stereo.

    100% it is! in regards to the tracking though, how will that effect a live situation? would live sound engineers create a stereo track from my two lines or would they just hard pan both tracks left and right?

  • A sound engineer would probably want a mono signal and place you where they think you sound best in the band mix. If you hand them a stereo signal they'll have to figure out what's what and be on their toes more.

  • 100% it is! in regards to the tracking though, how will that effect a live situation? would live sound engineers create a stereo track from my two lines or would they just hard pan both tracks left and right?

    If you present them with 2 mono feeds they'll mute one and use the other. If you give them a stereo feed they'll probably sigh and give you 2 channels panned L/R.


    Of course it depends on the situation and the engineer.

  • If you present them with 2 mono feeds they'll mute one and use the other. If you give them a stereo feed they'll probably sigh and give you 2 channels panned L/R.


    Of course it depends on the situation and the engineer.

    lol *sigh :D I get it... It's not making anything easier but that's a pretty shit attitude to have as a sound engineer. Those are the ones you don't want. I get it though, a good old mono rig is simple, tried and true.


    I don't think I'll actually commit to stereo since I'm not using a lot of super wet effects.

  • If both feeds are identical mono signals that's the right approach, no?

    I would think so. What's the point of having 2 mono signals from same source other than doubling the signal output. Unless you could add a delay to one of them, or maybe if you want to shift the signal off center and away from being on top the bass.


    I've used dual mono before with a delay on one side to simulate stereo.

    The more you find what Kemper can do then the harder you try to find what it cannot do -- like make a good cup of Frappuccino.

  • Dual mono is okay for sim stereo but tracking two separate guitars left and right is going to be light years better.

    The more you find what Kemper can do then the harder you try to find what it cannot do -- like make a good cup of Frappuccino.

  • If both feeds are identical mono signals that's the right approach, no?

    An engineer would do something very weird, he would communicate with you and ask you why you provide him with 2 signals. It's a bad idea to just assume something without knowing. It might be the same signal while patching the lines but different stuff during performance. As an engineer you'd be smart enough to figure that out even before soundcheck.

    Just as an example:

    95% of the gig it might be the same signal on both lines but in this one song where you grab your acoustic guitar, you might give him dry guitar on the first line and delay/reverb on the second so he can mix it nicely for the given venue.


    What I tried to say is that someone who calls himself an engineer should be a bit smarter and not just assume something he doesn't know yet. ;-) Or in other words, if he has worked with 9 dumb guitarists in the last month, it doesn't give him reason to assume the tenth guitarist is dumb as well, right?