Uprading to Windows 11 or better using Linux ?

  • Windows has always been an extremely bad solution for me when it comes to stability and simplicity - it's simply badly programmed.

    So I've always preferred Apple OSX and on PC Linux. But unfortunately, many manufacturers still do not offer a Linux version of their software.

    With the new release Windows 11 that could change soon, Windows 11 only runs on really new hardware.

    For example, my 3 year old computer with I7 9700K and TPM 2.0 chip is still supported. Older PC e.g. my old notebook ... no chance.


    I think Microsoft is screwing up its customers right now. Windows 10 will be supported for another 4 years, then it's over.


    In short, I think it is time for many manufacturers (including Kemper) to think about a Linux version of their software.

    Some manufacturers such as Reaper already offer Linux variants of their software.

    If you ask around on the net, there are many who are thinking about switching to Linux.

  • I switched over to Linux Mint a few years ago after buying a new laptop with Win10 preinstalled. There are alternatives for some software, and Wine can be used to run some windows apps, but I think that when I tried the Rig Manager with Wine there's an unsupported OS alert that prevents any further steps.


    The things I miss the most are not being able to audition profiles easily from the Rig Exchange, and easily selecting existing rigs.


    As far as windows is concerned, the user interface is a little more polished, but I don't miss it.

  • there's an entire massive thread on this topic elsewhere... you're dreaming. Gotta be realistic and think from a commercial perspective. There's no chance. Linux isn't mainstream for "general public / non-IT savvy people" and doubt ever will be. It's been around longer than time itself and hasn't so far.. so can't see it magically happening now. Windows 10 will be around quite a while yet and by the time its gone end of life most users will have moved on and upgraded. Computers have a much shorter shelf life than they used to and software companies rely on a good chunk of consumers getting bored and replacing with the latest and greatest. Not everyone does of course, but most do. Geez, I just replaced both my Mac's and they were only 4 years old :P. Did I need to? No. Did I want to? Hell yeah .. the new M1 chip is amazing! :-)


    So why would developers waste their precious resources, that have to be prioritised, on a platform used by a tiny fraction of the user base. There's so many more important things to be focusing on that impact a much larger portion of the customers.


    You can argue and ask software developers all you like but the reality is I just don't see it ever happening. Particularly when to do so may require hiring new developers etc.. why would they spend that kind of money.

  • I am using Linux professionally for 20 years now. 20 years on the server and for five years now on my main laptop that I use for work and most day to day stuff. So I would say I know a bit about the differences/advantages of Linux compared to Windows and MacOs. And also about the disadvantages.


    My stance on Linux on the desktop: I don't think that it will ever become mainstream. A more user-friendly distro could be created, but I can't see it happening, there is just not that much of an incentive for a manufacturer.


    For all music related stuff I use a Mac. And this most likely will not change. My DAW does not run under Linux. There are no Linux drivers for my audio interface. There is no rig manager for Linux and the list goes on. So much is missing. And I completly understand that there is no manufacturer too keen to support Linux. What would RigManager do good to me on Linux, when I cannot run my audio interface and my DAW simultanously?


    The next point is, that there is no one "Linux". You have distributions. Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, Suse, Arch and so forth. It is all highly fragmented. For a manufacturer a maintenance nightmare. What should Kemper do. It's difficult to support multiple Windows and Mac versions, but with Linux distributiuons, it get's tenfold complicated. And we only have talked about Linux distributions so far, we haven't not yet mentioned window managers at all.


    So, as much as I would like to have a RigManager on Linux and as much as I would like to do all my audio related stuff under Linux - I am not counting on it in the slightest way.

  • I think anyone who develops software these days does so with a framework that supports many different operating systems.

    Whether it's classic something like QT or JUCE or something else. I myself work on client server WEB apps (Pyton / C ++ and Go) for various companies, and today all of them use e.g. "Docker" as a runtime environment. All manufacturers have to deliver mobile phone apps as well.

    So today it is no longer a problem to program for different operating systems if you use the right technology.

  • Windows bashing? Who would have thought.


    If you're comparing Windows to Mac or Linux you can't leave out the incredible amount of flexibility Windows has to be capable of. If you can do what you need on Mac or Linux then great.


    I haven't had a Windows crash in many years. Our business users also like Microsoft software, like Power BI, Teams, Dynamics, etc. Some of the best software that's ever been created. But Microsoft sucks, I guess.


    Apples for apples.

  • I think anyone who develops software these days does so with a framework that supports many different operating systems.

    Whether it's classic something like QT or JUCE or something else. I myself work on client server WEB apps (Pyton / C ++ and Go) for various companies, and today all of them use e.g. "Docker" as a runtime environment. All manufacturers have to deliver mobile phone apps as well.

    So today it is no longer a problem to program for different operating systems if you use the right technology.

    sorry mate, but I don't think it's so simple.


    if it was, then every software product under the sun would be written to work on every operating system and the premise of your post wouldn't be relevant. Clearly, it's not.. coz the vast majority of applications do not work in linux :)


    sure some of the underlying stuff might work, but there's so many other variables at play and interdependencies.


    like I said, market share of user base for linux is so small it's not worth noting. So why would developers bother.

  • There's more chance that mobiles running Android will be supported, then, back ported to Linux.


    However, there's also the Steam Deck pushing for improved support on Linux for gaming. Considering Steam also sells music making software, then, there's a chance that the tide will turn sooner rather than later.


    On the other hand; there's also Windows supporting ARM, so, we could potentially see even wider adoption for Windows, rather than less.

  • the vast majority of applications do not work in linux

    oh yeah man, what a discovery. Because they where not written for Linux. And they where not written with some kind of OS independent framework like QT. For instance, XnView is a nice photo and image album program, running on Linux as well as on Windows (Mac, I do not know).


    I am mostly running Mint Linux on my desktop system. Only when I run RigManager and some very view other programs, I am booting Windows.

    I tried to use RigManager within Linux virtualization software (Qemu/boxes), Windows in this box. This works, but due to USB virtualizations, it is kinda slow. So, I would like to see RigManager running native in Linux. But I think, Kemper will not support this because to few users are Linux guys, and because this would only affordable, if RigManager was written with such an OS independant layer framework.

  • I've tried to run Rigmanager on Linux with Wine a few months back, but had no luck. Rigmanager uses the dotnet framework, and these type of applications are difficult to get working on Wine.

    If there would be a native Linux Version of Rigmanager i'd change over to Linux immediately.

  • I have not run into one bug using Windows OS for recording and DAW. I was on Windows 7 64b, upgraded to Windows 10 64b (for free from MS website), and I expect to upgrade to Windows 11 when the time comes.


    Music is not the only thing I do on a computer so using any other platform would mess up my day severely.

    The more you find what Kemper can do then the harder you try to find what it cannot do -- like make a good cup of Frappuccino.

  • I've been a Linux user for the past 20 years. I almost don't even use Wine since I've found a native replacement for most things. With that said, I don't think it would make sense for Kemper to invest energy in a Linux port, even if I would be the first one to appreciate it. The HiDPI part of the editor is not even done in Windows so I don't have much hope for Linux. However, with the iPad app using the network instead of USB, I can see an update to Rig Manager that would run off the network instead of relying on the USB drivers. Then, I guess Wine would be able to run it and I would be really happy :)