Input Level Adjustment!

  • I would love to have an input-auto-adjustment.


    When I switch from guitar to an active bass I often forget to change the input parameters (which aren’t intuitive for me).


    Would be great not to have a need to think about that. ?

  • I do understand what you wish for but I do not understand why you wish for it.


    I've been using Profilers for over 9 years now and I never felt the need to adjust Clean/Dist Sense, let alone any form of input level adjustment. Is this because I'm an old fart and I grew up with tube amps that don't have this either? Even if we assume you have a pedalboard in front of your tube amp, you'll likely never have anything to level your guitar signal before it hits the first stomp box / pedal.

    Yes, of course your pedalboard might have e.g. a booster pedal or other means to adjust how much level hits the amp. But that's the same with the STOMP slots on the Profiler, right?


    Also, if I switch the guitar, e.g. from a Les Paul with humbuckers to a Strat with single coils, I expect it to sound different ... well, actually I want it to sound and behave different. That's why I switch guitars in the first place and that's what happens on a real tube amp as well. So if I need to change the sound after switching guitars I either quickly adjust the amp settings, or in Kemper world I just switch the rig accordingly.


    Bottomline:

    I can't see any reason to adjust input levels unless the guitar/bass clips the input. Maybe I'm lucky and don't own any guitar/bass that clips the Profiler input?

  • Like Marten, I understand the request but can't follow the logic.


    I have never changed Distortion Send and very rarely move Clean Sense. These are very much "set and forget l" controls.


    I understand the notion that that higher output (humbucker) guitars might need a different input setting than lower output (single coil) guitars but in reality they usually don't. If they did, you would need to adjust Clean Sense every time you switched pickup in an HSS guitar. Nobody does that.


    One of my guitars is a PRS 513 which has 3 distinct pickup modes: true single coil, classic humbucker and high output heavy humbucker. I can use the same input settings for every pickup option on that guitar whether position 4 out of phase strat single coils or bridge heavy humbucker.

  • The OP didn't mention adjusting clean or distortion sense. I believe he is just talking about adjusting for the volume level between various pickups.


    I have a small clean boost pedal on my board to compensate for the volume drop off when I switch to a single coil or an in between sound on my HSS guitar. It would be nice to not to have to use that pedal and have it automatically adjust. I think that is what he is asking for.


    I think the compressor in the amp block of the Kemper does this. I know it will keep your volume from dropping off when you roll back your volume. To be honest, now that I am thinking about it, I haven't really noticed the drop off in volume with my Kemper that I typically get when using my amp and pedal board. I think the compressor in the amp block is already compensating for this. It may be worth testing some adjustments to that compressor to see if you can get what you are looking for with what is already in the Kemper.

  • But why would you use a compressor to reduce the beautiful dynamics of your guitar signal? I still don't get it.

    And if you want to compensate for a more quiet guitar that you don't want to be more quiet ... well, there's this GAIN control that does exactly what it suggests, adds or reduces gain going into the amp.


    Basically an input gain / level control is ONLY necessary if your guitar clips the input stage of the Profiler. If clipping doesn't happen, there's exactly ZERO need to adjust input gain.

  • I would love to have an input-auto-adjustment.


    When I switch from guitar to an active bass I often forget to change the input parameters (which aren’t intuitive for me).


    Would be great not to have a need to think about that. ?

    I don't get it....Do you use the same presets on both? Input can be set per preset.

  • But why would you use a compressor to reduce the beautiful dynamics of your guitar signal? I still don't get it.

    And if you want to compensate for a more quiet guitar that you don't want to be more quiet ... well, there's this GAIN control that does exactly what it suggests, adds or reduces gain going into the amp.


    Basically an input gain / level control is ONLY necessary if your guitar clips the input stage of the Profiler. If clipping doesn't happen, there's exactly ZERO need to adjust input gain.

    Read up on the compressor in the amp block. There have been some posts on it here. It isn't the typical compressor. It is there to maintain your volume when you roll back the guitar volume to change your tone.



    I don't get it....Do you use the same presets on both? Input can be set per preset.

    I personally use the same rigs for all of my guitars. I treat them exactly the same way I do may amp and pedal board.

  • I'm an old fart and I grew up with tube amps


    I switch the guitar, e.g. from a Les Paul with humbuckers to a Strat with single coils, I expect it to sound different ... well, actually I want it to sound and behave different.

    Yep (same here) ... Just Saying

  • It isn't the typical compressor. It is there to maintain your volume when you roll back the guitar volume to change your tone.

    Yep, I know that and it's helpful if you need that "compact" (evened out) volume. I know that the way you pick the strings still controls the range from clean to crunch ... if the profile allows for it. But ... is it really necessary to even out things? Why are some people so afraid of playing quiet?


    Let me offer you to watch one of the greatest dynamic electric guitar performances ever. But do yourself a favour. It's almost half an hour long. Don't spoil the experience and skip through it. Watch it in its entirety when you have time to do so. There should be a law that requires every electric guitarist to watch (and enjoy) this, seriously. :)

  • If I take an amp and set it perfectly for a HB guitar it won't get pushed the same way with a Strat. So I always had a clean boost pedal for switching between them.

    I like the Input section the way it is. Distortion Sense feels right to me. It sounds like it's pushing the amp more, but while retaining the volume differences between pickups.

    I can see the appeal to doing this automatically, but I don't want it continually changing my volume and if I have to get it to "read" the guitar or select a preset each time I change guitars then it's not easier.

  • Basically I agree a bit as some guitars tend to have too much input for the Kemper and therefore tend to potential clipping issues. So an additional option to reduce the input level on a global basis could be good as clean sense is for another purpose (balancing clean and high gain profiles).

  • Yep, I know that and it's helpful if you need that "compact" (evened out) volume. I know that the way you pick the strings still controls the range from clean to crunch ... if the profile allows for it. But ... is it really necessary to even out things? Why are some people so afraid of playing quiet?


    Let me offer you to watch one of the greatest dynamic electric guitar performances ever. But do yourself a favour. It's almost half an hour long. Don't spoil the experience and skip through it. Watch it in its entirety when you have time to do so. There should be a law that requires every electric guitarist to watch (and enjoy) this, seriously. :)

    I completely agree with you. I am a player that understands dynamics. It is definitely not as common knowledge as it should be. What I am saying is that the compressor in the amp block works a little differently than what most people are used to using. It doesn't kill my dynamics. It just helps not lose all of my volume when I roll back a little to clean the tone up some. I have OD pedals that react this same way and others that do not. This compressor is much smoother and transparent than the ones available in the stomp section of the Kemper. What I am wondering is if someone could adjust this compressor to achieve what the OP was asking for. What they are asking for may already be possible.

  • What I am saying is that the compressor in the amp block works a little differently than what most people are used to using. It doesn't kill my dynamics. It just helps not lose all of my volume when I roll back a little to clean the tone up some.

    That’s because it’s designed to mimic the way the power tubes of a driven amp work rather than be a “compressor “ effect. It isn’t just rolling down the guitar volume that it affects though. It also makes the amp feel a bit spongey like driven power tubes do. However, it can go way further than a real amp and can get pretty unnatural if used excessively.

  • But why would you use a compressor to reduce the beautiful dynamics of your guitar signal? I still don't get it.

    And if you want to compensate for a more quiet guitar that you don't want to be more quiet ... well, there's this GAIN control that does exactly what it suggests, adds or reduces gain going into the amp.


    Basically an input gain / level control is ONLY necessary if your guitar clips the input stage of the Profiler. If clipping doesn't happen, there's exactly ZERO need to adjust input gain.

    input gain could be a great thing due to the nature of the kemper : profiling.
    The profiling of an amp is also dealing with the guitar plugged in.
    having a input gain could help people that do not profile their own amps.


    That’s how I see it.


    Clean sense and dist sense are great but adding a simple input gain to fine tune a profile for your guitar could just be great.


    I’ve always play tube amps and the input and the way it deals with pickups is one of tue things that could really be improved.


    My main guitar is a mahogany telecaster with JB in the bridge (with split) and single di marzio telecaster neck (don’t remember the name an old one).
    I played professionally with many bands doing many many styles and with an amp it was the most versatile guitar I ever had. And I’m also a volume pot kind of guy. I could play a entire show with a one channel amp.
    With the kemper it’s not that versatile anymore.


    switching from the neck to the bridge gives me more gain, more body, more « push », more fullness in the amp.
    In kemper it’s not doing that. It sounds more distorted but don’t have the « hompf » like I had with a tube amp at all. Depending on the profile (but honestly most of it) the neck pickup sound more full and bodied than the JB. Volume pot does also not really work the way it use to be.


    Also, maybe that is just me but the dynamics is over exagerated compared to an amp. It react too drastically compared to an amp.

    Are you guys have a solution for that?

    Maybe I’m doing something wrong, don’t know.


    As English is not my main language I may be not express myself the way I want it, sorry.