Really (!) good sounding reverbs

  • I do exactly the same as you do, but I rarely use backing tracks. I play along with the original and raise my guitar's volume a bit so I will sound slightly louder. And like you, I loop phrases in my DAW for rehearsing parts and finally I record the whole song again but now with my guitar.

    And like you, everything is done with my profiler, connected to one of my mixers, a Soundcraft Notepad mixer with usb to my computer and my midi controller combined with 2 KRK studio monitors 100 W each. And all of this in my recording studio at home.

    Just to add, I think what BayouTexan is really saying is that reverb whilst it adds depth, also has the potential to make things more "mushy".


    Rich deep reverbs sound great in isolation but often get lost in the mix and in fact can make your whole guitar disappear (depending on what else is going on with the band) hence when setting it up you need to check this. This doesn't really show with backing tracks at home, but will do live.


    As a result I don't use any reverb live. Means my guitar always cuts through.


    Not saying don't use reverb, but don't spend so much time getting these fantastic reverbs only to find they don't work live.

  • Burkhard

    Changed the title of the thread from “Really (!() good sounding reverbs” to “Really (!) good sounding reverbs”.
  • By the way ... the Main Manual is not just available in English. It's also available in French, Spanish, German, and Japanese.

    OK, I think I know my English very well but get often lost in all technical English jargon and the correponding explanations. BTW I'm from The Netherlands. You should try to read and understand a Dutch extensive manual....:)

  • I have found that reverb on distortion sounds better in isolation than live ..... but ..... even live, a good clean frequently sounds better with a good reverb (and possibly delay).


    Some songs (like U2) use reverb and delay as a signature sound of the song. Everyone here just try to imagine what "streets have no name" would sound like with a dry guitar ;).

  • OK, I think I know my English very well but get often lost in all technical English jargon and the correponding explanations. BTW I'm from The Netherlands. You should try to read and understand a Dutch extensive manual....:)

    I'm German, but prefer English manuals since that is the origin of a lot of guitar and audio related terminology. You are very active in this English forum and that seems to work!?

  • i don´t think reverb make things more "mushy" if you use a good one and know how to set it up.

    e.g. check out the insane amount of reverb on Van Halen records, a LOT on rhythm guitars (as on everything else).

    TBH the first albums weren't a great mix...very little bass etc. Powered through on volume.


    Of course a really well constructed mix and sound will be an exception. Simple rule of thumb is that for mere mortals, this is a risk...its also most noticeable in a twin guitar band where you are competing for sonic space.

  • Not saying don't use reverb, but don't spend so much time getting these fantastic reverbs only to find they don't work live.

    One if my main solo sounds live uses the Ionosphere Reverb that adds a lovely octave up effect to the reverb tail and if you set your volume, predelay and mix correctly you can have a quite wet sound that works beautifully live.

    Of course, in a solo situation it's easier since these is no vocal to compete with...

  • As a rule of thumb when using higher amounts of reverb set the predelay time higher.

    The consequence is that the transients of the initial attack of the guitar will come through unaltered by reverb. This will make the guitar much more present (and not buried) in the mix without losing the room information supplied by the reverb.

  • i don´t think reverb make things more "mushy" if you use a good one and know how to set it up.

    e.g. check out the insane amount of reverb on Van Halen records, a LOT on rhythm guitars (as on everything else).

    The reverb was put on during mixing and not while recording.

    Think for yourself, or others will think for you wihout thinking of you

    Henry David Thoreau

  • The arrangements of some songs are written/produced to leave enough space for big reverb. "Wicked Game" is very sparse, leaving a lot of room for the big reverb on the guitar. "Streets Have No Name" is essentially bass, drums, and one extremely large guitar.

    Yes, that's what I thought. It all comes from the guitar and that's how I did this. With one of these downloaded meambobbo reverbs from 2015. Sounds great for this song.

  • Yes, that's what I thought. It all comes from the guitar and that's how I did this. With one of these downloaded meambobbo reverbs from 2015. Sounds great for this song.

    Interesting that Wicked Game is mentioned. For me the key to that song is not just reverb, but ~800ms delay with lot's of repeats. That tone is based on the delay IMO..