Posts by Pre-Amp

    I’ve played in a band that was all direct to the desk. Electric drums, bass amp head DI, keyboards, acoustic guitar DI and of course the Kemper.
    Only one mono stage wedge for the bass player, everyone else using in ears.

    I used a Behringer P16 to mix my monitoring. It’s like hearing a recording. There’s proper separation of sounds through decent panning, eq per channel and over the whole mix and a limiter!
    I never want to go back to using my 100 watt Marshall, the bass players 500watt mega speaker the keyboard player’s dodgey full range “amp” and a full on ear shattering cymbal fest of a drum kit!
    Trying to get half decent sound out of all that is a real challenge. Give me my MR18, Behringer p16 and IEMs any day. Oh and they weigh next to nothing! Venues prefer it once they understand the advantages in terms of sound quality. They like the look of all the amps and shiny cymbals, but they get narked if you disturb the neighbourhood or trigger the db meter power blocker.
    I remember it took one snare hit to kill all the power in a venue a few years ago! The owner just pulled the plug from the meter and reset the fuse box. On went the show, far too loud really and certainly nowhere near the db meter cut off!
    Cheers

    Pre-Amp

    All of the above is sage advice. I think that as long as your overall tone is close, effects like delay etc are authentic and faithful to the essence of the record, it’s your playing attitude, delivery and style that will either carry or crush your performances. I suspect (as it is a friend you are playing for) you will be all over the parts and do a great job of that. Furthermore the sound engineer will probably eq you, messing with your sound anyway. Tone is only a tenth of the deal when convincing a crowd. It’s the icing rather than the cake.
    Having said that, cake sounds rather good to me. Lemon drizzle or triple chocolate…. Decisions decisions…

    Good luck on your quest!

    Cheers

    Pre-Amp

    My advice is to monitor through in ear headphones. Make sure that they seal your ear canal while playing using transpose. The tonal clash otherwise is just headache inducing. Even with in-ears you can still make out the actual guitar tuning if you monitor quietly.
    Good luck though, it’s a really useful tool once you get around this issue.

    Cheers

    Pre-Amp

    Hi,

    Old fashioned fluorescent tube lights or lights with dimmer switches, typically cause this buzzing interference. Turning them off is the easiest solution!
    Another issue that I’ve had problems with in the past are hearing aid induction loops. They can wreak havoc with your signal especially with single coil guitars. If a neighbour has an induction loop, and you play a single coil Strat, you’ll be treated to whatever they are listening to on their loop, or if the just leave it on all the time, an annoying hiss/buzz! You’ll hear it on whatever you use for monitoring and it drive me insane before I worked out what the problem was.
    Fortunately, I regained my sanity once the neighbour (who said they never linked their hearing aids to it anyway!) turned it off.
    Some venues have induction loops, often quite crude setups with condenser mics set up in bizarre locations to ‘capture the room’ which cause awful sound issues when amplified first by the Kemper and then again by the PA! So I always ask prior to the gig for them to be switched off.
    Saves a lot of puzzling out and settings tweaking!
    Helpful to know about induction loops because when you stumble upon one without knowing it’s there, it can really throw you and make you think something in your gear is broken! It’s not. You just have to find the loop off switch! That has been known to involve ladders, phone calls to various parties etc to locate and then switch off.
    Hope you sort it out.

    Pre-Amp

    Hi,

    Where have you placed the reverb in your fx chain? Is it pre-amp block (ooo look, there’s my tag!) or post-amp block? If it’s before the amp, could you just be driving the amp a bit hard and causing the profile to clip?
    If you have a delay slot open and your reverb is in its usual place after the amp, then have a look at the delay + reverb balance, it’s really well described in the main manual. It controls the routing of said Fx, perhaps that is causing a volume bump somehow?
    Maybe you just need to reduce the mix a bit, 85% is quite wet for a reverb especially as you’ve added lots of drip stone etc.

    Is it the same if you change the amp for another or does it stay the same?
    Have a look in the Amp block and see if tweaking the cabinet high and low sensitivity helps.
    Equally, there is a compressor setting in the amp block that might help even things out especially if the reverb comes before the amp.
    Then there is the Definition and Clarity controls in the amp block which might also help out a bit to enable you to turn down the amp output volume but compensate the tone to keep the sparkle. These Amp block settings might be a good place to start and see if you can exercise the desired improvement with the minimum tweaking.
    I’d take that Eq out first and try with your original sound and see how close I can get. Definition and clarity first I think.
    It could just be a sonic spike or build up of a certain frequency that can be tamed without the eq.
    One final thought, just check you haven’t got parallel path activated or the direct mix turned up in the amp, perhaps there’s more in your signal at output than you need.
    I hope this has been some help.
    Let us know how you get on.

    Cheers

    Pre-Amp

    Hi!

    I expect that if you always set up to record both your main outputs including any wet signal (modulation, delay, reverbs) and your dry guitar input with no processing, then you can re-amp as much as you like to get the tone/part you want.
    Just set up your Kemper outputs as explained in the manual. You can even choose just ‘Stack’ if you love the amp sound but want that tracked dry.
    Then set up your Daw to record the Main Outs on one stereo track and the other Direct Out or Monitor Out (whichever you choose) to a separate track. This will be a mono rendition of your dry signal.
    Now your wet recording acts as a guide so that the producer/mix engineer/mate who’s doing you a favour/yourself in your back room, can create the same sort of sound/vibe but with greater overall control as Dr Bob said. Or it might just work anyway! I think the sound Dr Bob ended up with wasn’t that great really! Pretty sure that if you were doing this yourself using Re-Amping with the Kemper right in front of you, the results would be superior.
    Use your ears and monitor quietly and carefully knowing your room sound signature.
    Just my thoughts.
    Good luck!
    Pre-Amp

    Yup, the ‘Old Marshall’ is still one of my favourites.
    It needs a slight adjustment on the highs and some extra care to reduce string squeaks when moving one’s fingers. The tone just has something that keeps me playing!
    I tend to reduce the highs at the the high cut option in the output menu. I’ve found it’s the best way for me to achieve more consistent, realistic guitar tone across all rigs.
    Pre-Amp

    Yup, Been doing this for a while.
    Helps to use a dual footswitch with loop start and loop stop assigned to it. Then you avoid having to switch in and out of looper mode to change rigs.
    I use a performance with 5 rigs, sometimes copies of the same basic rig plus different Fx, sometimes all different rigs depending on what I want to create. Then use the slot button positions to reference them in the stereo field via the panorama feature. Slot 1 hard left, Slot 5 hard right, slot 3 dead centre with 2 and 4 50% left and right respectfully. This gives loads of sound options especially if you use the acoustic simulator as well as clean, crunch and lead rigs to build your sounds.

    One guitar can create an incredible wall of sound.
    Setting the rig panoramas up in this way gives you a physical reference for where the sound will be placed for the audience too. It’s especially helpful when using stereo in ears to monitor.

    If you want to simplify to try it out, try using one rig but engage the double tracker via stomp switch I -IV for your main loop pattern and then turn it off to solo on top via the more centred sound. This can make one guitar sound like three pretty quickly.

    Just watch the output volume as layers can build up causing the output led to clip.

    Lots of fun to be had with this approach to looping.
    Cheers

    Pre-Amp

    Midas MR18 plus ultranet connection to a P16 personal monitor gives 16 channels to personalise your mix. Once you get it dialled in it’s amazing.
    no more volume wars, clear eq’d channels, panning, channel linking for stereo instruments, grouping channels for entire drum kits etc.

    Your own, bespoke, consistent and balanced monitor mix in glorious stereo.

    It’s probably as much the environmental factors as anything else. If you are playing in a garage, you may have more reflective surfaces bouncing the sound around. If you have a large flat metal garage door in the room, that won’t help much. It would be like playing in a metal box. Is there any carpet on the floor? I guess you have your speaker cab placed directly on the ground, not isolated like studio monitors. So all in all it’s never going to sound the same as a recording.
    Trying to tweak a profile to suit that kind of environment would be a challenge for anyone.
    Hope you sort it out.

    Pre-Amp

    Hi,

    I assume you can trigger the backing tracks and loops independently of each other? If so, I would put it after the main outputs before any mixing desk. However, that may cause you an issue if you intend to use the monitor output for monitoring , as the loops and backing tracks would not be present. Any monitoring would have to be provided from the desk in this case.
    There have been some other threads talking about using third party loopers. I seem to remember there was one where someone was struggling with getting Jamman levels right. It was a while ago now though.
    Good luck.
    Hope you work it out.

    Cheers

    Pre-Amp

    Interesting thread.
    I find slowing everything down, particularly difficult phrases/lines/lyrics, very helpful. It allows my brain to learn the entire rhythm of the piece a bit like learning a drum part. I can then work out how the vocal and guitar parts fit together with the most accurate timing. When I’ve got that sorted, rehearsed and committed to memory, I begin to gradually speed it up.
    Like some other’s here, I look at the song as an combined performance making one entity, this helps to develop a more engaging performance that is very well rehearsed but sounds natural and not robotic.
    Holfing notes at the end of lines is an interesting one, it can be very easy to over for this just as it is very easy to completely forget it’s importance in a live situation.
    Good luck with improving this skill set.
    Cheers

    Pre-Amp

    I would love this too. It would significantly improve the looper. Also, to have the option to switch off the reverse loop button in looper mode would be really useful. I accidentally hit that button during a song at a gig creating what could only be described as a bit of a pickle! Ruined the song for a feature I might use once in a very blue moon.
    Merry Christmas!

    Pre-Amp