level monitoring

  • I know this has been already asked... but I renew the subject:


    I would like to have a way other than the colour led to monitoring the input and output signal levels.


    the top would be to have a signal monitoring also after each section (stomp, stack, fx) even a numeric value will be great.


    thanks

    F

  • What’s the workflow challenge that you’re trying to solve with more metering? E.g. preventing overload of analogue inputs on a mixing desk or audio interface?


    Is the metering you imagine a bar graph-style meter with a dBFS, or a dBu scale? The former would be common to most digital desks and DAW metering, where analogue equipment would feature the latter.

  • I made a post about it here.

    Rig Manager: view duplicates | profile level matching | input metering and recommendations | compressor: display compression amount |


    dBFS is what I'd like, horizontal and in the box already on the "input" page.


    An input monitor would hopefully make profiling and use more consistent. Normal guitar amps don't have input controls, so some sense of "unity" would be useful for appropriate gain staging.

  • I want to know how much I'm compressing while a compressor is engaged. And also be able to match the level of my Tele with a gold foil pickup (probably hotter than SC) with my stratocaster.


    Further, when there's digital clipping on the Kemper, I'd like to know what stage it's at: the input? the amp stage? the output?

  • For the compressor and leveling matching: We believe that for decades leveling in an artistic fashion always gives the best results when done by ear, not by eyes.

    Please keep in mind, that the Profiler does not have a true input level control, as it is distributed to Clean Sense and Distortion Sense.


    You can clip the Profiler either on the input or the output. This is why we have the input and output LED.

    However, the Profiler is build in such way that you cannot clip it in between the signal flow. That‘s the benefit of a digital amp.

  • I wonder why?

    Does it help to set up the compressor in a better way?

    Yes it does. It’s the reason why most of the best compressors in the world have metering and all the best producers and engineers use them. It makes things reliably reproducible time and time again when using unfamiliar gear or trying to recreate a certain setting.

    Why bother having ms read outs for delays when you can just guess and get in the ballpark? People like precision to make things reproducible and accurate.

  • This kind of metering was recently introduced on the Helix and they were at pains to show how pointless it was on release. I guess most compressors used traditionally on guitars where pedals with no visual indication.

  • This kind of metering was recently introduced on the Helix and they were at pains to show how pointless it was on release. I guess most compressors used traditionally on guitars where pedals with no visual indication.

    Speak for yourself. The compressors I have used in the studio for the last 30 years were not pedals.

  • Speak for yourself. The compressors I have used in the studio for the last 30 years were not pedals.

    Apologies and I stand corrected. Personally, I still use a DBX160 when recording and use my ears in the studio rather than gain reduction meters.


    I certainly wouldn't want to stand in the way of someone asking for a new feature.

  • It’s like a recipe. If you have done something previously and it turned out great, you would reproduce the steps exactly to ensure the same results.

    I have sounds over the last few decades that I like and know how to reproduce. To reproduce them, you need to know exactly what they were in the first place.

  • It’s like a recipe. If you have done something previously and it turned out great, you would reproduce the steps exactly to ensure the same results.

    I have sounds over the last few decades that I like and know how to reproduce. To reproduce them, you need to know exactly what they were in the first place.

    Sure.

    But these kind of indicators would be as useful as in a compressor.

    Every Amp Profile and every distortion pedal features a similar gain reduction (due to distortion) and often a make-up gain. And thus probably asking for a reproduction recipe.

    Why is nobody asking for visualizing this? Because it‘s not known yet?

  • Sure.

    But these kind of indicators would be as useful as in a compressor.

    Every Amp Profile and every distortion pedal features a similar gain reduction (due to distortion) and often a make-up gain. And thus probably asking for a reproduction recipe.

    Why is nobody asking for visualizing this? Because it‘s not known yet?

    Well, for me personally, I know how I want my amps to sound distortion wise. How much sensitivity and where to set the volume on my favourite 50 watt non master Marshall’s.

    I have a lovely profile of one of my most sensitive 78 (1987 model) heads. I like to set the volume on this one at 10 whereas the other two I have I set to 8 to leave the headroom. This one just sounds great at 10 and does not squash down. It’s a very polite amp and has a finesse about it with a little less gain than the others. The other two, I set at 8 including a 68 plexi small box from 68 as they do squash down when set on 10 without having any more gain.

    I would never compress these further in the studio as they just sound good and are pretty squared off wave wise.

    The compressor thing is purely for clean studio sounds. I like to use a dbx 160 for that set to 10db of gain reduction.

    I will tell you, I have never been happier with my studio and live setup since switching to Kemper. To have my actual amps profiled is unbelievable.
    Not knocking anything you do Christoph. I absolutely love my Kempers. I have bought 3 in the last year. 😊