Volume pedal recalibration?

  • Frequently I notice my sound doesn't seem to be all "there." When I notice this I of course freak out(because it's at a show or rehearsal) then I check the calibration of my volume pedal (Dunlop dvp3) and see that in the "toe position" on the calibration page it's not fully at 100% and I have to recalibrate. Why is this happening? It doesn't happen always but it is very frustrating to have to try to do this with all of the other distractions setting up, soundchecking, etc. and I usually don't notice until we're on our way with the show and my kemper isn't always accessible. Why doesn't the calibration stay put? Does this happen to anyone else and is there a fix? Thx -John

  • Are you unplugging/plugging in your pedal while the Kemper is on?

    Kemper PowerRack | Rivera 4x12 V30 cab | Yamaha DXR10 pair | UA Apollo Twin Duo | Adam A7X | Cubase DAW
    Fender Telecaster 62 re-issue chambered mahogany | Kramer! (1988 or so...) | Gibson Les Paul R7 | Fender Stratocaster HBS-1 Classic Relic Custom Shop

  • my Stage (os 7.1.5) is fix in our rehearsalroom since last 2 months, plugged 2 pedals, vol. and morph, and every week when powering on I need to re-plug and recalibrate the volumepedal.

    Thinking of the mentioned trouble some guys have with their devices I'm just happy that the rest of this machine is (still) working properly...

  • It might be an issue of the pedal. Change your pedals an find out if the Dunlop behaves as morph-pedal in the same way as in the function of volume.

    I've had anther pedal. A broken cry baby that I gutted and made into an expression pedal(I know what I'm doing) that has done the same when I used in a different slot on my remote do it as well when I would try to use it for pitch shifter. Toe down should have been an octave but periodically it would be off and when I checked that also showed the little gap that it wasn't at 100%.

  • Not on purpose. But maybe sometimes the pedal gets plugged in after the Kemper is powered on. But that's just something I'm guessing at. What's the theory behind that? Is there a known issue?

    Yes. The Kemper has an auto-calibration feature, so the short-circuit that briefly appears when you plug it in will tell the Kemper that the pedal is able to deliver a smaller resistance (0 ohms or so) than the toe position is able to once calibrated.

    Kemper PowerRack | Rivera 4x12 V30 cab | Yamaha DXR10 pair | UA Apollo Twin Duo | Adam A7X | Cubase DAW
    Fender Telecaster 62 re-issue chambered mahogany | Kramer! (1988 or so...) | Gibson Les Paul R7 | Fender Stratocaster HBS-1 Classic Relic Custom Shop

  • I've had anther pedal. A broken cry baby that I gutted and made into an expression pedal(I know what I'm doing) that has done the same when I used in a different slot on my remote do it as well when I would try to use it for pitch shifter. Toe down should have been an octave but periodically it would be off and when I checked that also showed the little gap that it wasn't at 100%.

    Definately a bit odd...I have done the same with a crybaby and I also have a regular expression pedal...I've not had to calibrate them since I connected them 5 years ago...hmmm

  • Yes. The Kemper has an auto-calibration feature, so the short-circuit that briefly appears when you plug it in will tell the Kemper that the pedal is able to deliver a smaller resistance (0 ohms or so) than the toe position is able to once calibrated.

    so are you saying everything should be plugged in when started up?

  • Yes. The Kemper has an auto-calibration feature, so the short-circuit that briefly appears when you plug it in will tell the Kemper that the pedal is able to deliver a smaller resistance (0 ohms or so) than the toe position is able to once calibrated.

    It would be useful if the auto calibrate feature could be selectively made inactive. With certain pedals it can be a hindrance as much as its a help. (As described by musicmad ).

    pedals that have a sprung limit (perhaps a foam or rubber cushion at toe and heel limits) may also permit a greater minimum and maximum value than when at resting by taking your foot off.