Posts by ReinoutV

    First things first: what do you want exactly? What are the connections you are making right now, how are your IEM's connected to the system (given by stage or by FOH or my separate mixing board)?


    Send main output to FOH: buy two XLR cables and connect both of 'em.

    FOH mix to aux input: the FOH board has a few auxiliary outputs, one of the could be connected (with a TRS cable) to the aux in of the stage, so you could monitor the stage via IEM and hear the rest of the band.


    But maybe you don't want this at all, and you're looking for a different solution to a different problem :-).

    I would advice to stick with the release versions, if you want to have the least problems as possible. As Burkhard said, the release version is a few below the version you installed. Especially as one who plays the guitar professionally and has to live from gigs an studio recordings, you would want a stable setup. The release versions always update without any problems, at least in my case. And I bought my Kemper back in 2012.


    Edit: in the settings of rig manager, it's possible to switch between release and beta-versions. It will then only notify you of an update, if the new release version is available.

    Subtractive eq is there, so that one does not run into clipping issues in the DAW. Also, to prevent one for the louder is better trap.


    In your case, you're looking for clipping. And a lot of it! So, if it sounds good to your ears, and it works for you, go with it. As traditional and conservative as guitarists are, there are no rules.

    I don't know exactly what you mean, but here's my take on it.


    1. So, the beginning of the song is in C major. That means, that every D that's played need to be harmonized with an F. At the end of the feared melody, the same note D is in a different key (D major) and needs to be harmonized with an F#.


    2. There is deemed to be some latency when switching anything, so you have to make a decision:


    3a. Switch to a different performance (or morph the key?) before the last note of the fast run.

    3b. Switch to a different performance before the run, and engage the harmonizer only on the last note. You can do this a few notes in advance, only after you've played an A (in C major it's harmonized with a C, in D major with a C#), if this is a note that is played in this melody (I can't recall).

    3c. Leave if off ;-).

    The F# is the third degree on the note D, which is the last note of the 'problem line'. It's not in the key of C (it has a minor third on the second degree of the scale), as are the other notes in this melody. So yes, you have to switch presets, if you want a major third on the D. Or you could morph the preset from C major to D major, but I haven't fiddled around with that.

    The problem is, you need to play the F sharp in the second voice. There is no option to do this in the key of C (other than going lydian, but that's not the case here). You need the F (natural) in the lines before that.


    Without tapdancing the only possibility is to switch the effect off on the last note. I'm afraid the only thing you can do is to make a second rig in D, which you switch just before the last note. Or, switch to that rig before the last run (with the harmonizer off), and turn the effect on only for the last note. The harmonizer doesn't add much on the fast run, it's all about the harmony on the last note.


    I hope this helps!

    I agree, options would be great. I use volume and wah all the time. If there was a remote with expression pedal(s) available, I would buy it without hesitation. As of now, I'm sticking to my Uno4Kemper FCB1010, although it runs on 3 cables. Having the remote ánd two expression pedals connected with small cables is very finicky.

    I can confirm, a simple 2-button momentary switch works fine. Just read the manual for the functions, 3 times stop means your loop is erased, for example. Also, the visual feedback isn't there, the remote is a better (but also more expensive) solution.

    And don't forget: the cab including the speakers, the mic and the pre-amp are profiled as well. Heck, even the cables and the room could have an influence on the sound. So there are a lot of variables to take into account while profiling one and the same amp. And no two guitarists will set one amp to the same settings (gain, eq, volume, whatever), so there are the multitude of profiles available for free and for sale.

    I know of quite a few scenarios where additional AD/DA conversions are made in a studio setting like sending a track to a speaker to record/add room ambiance, to excite acoustic guitars tuned to chords, or to a tape machine and back...


    What I mean is, there are more important things to consider than additional AD/DA conversions.

    Yes, you're absolutely correct, although I didn't know about these techniques. I think most of us work more in home-studios than in top-of-the-notch studios who can afford the time to do these things. When you can afford A/D converters of 2000 bucks (I worked in a studio once that had these), it's a different story of course. In home-studio, I think it's more convenient, as Bryan Daste said, to use the S/PDIF direct out.

    Since we're recording digitally (I think), the less A/D and D/A conversion there is, the better. So my solution would be to use the S/PDIF output for the direct signal. Then only the Kemper makes an A/D conversion once. When you record the other S/PDIF output with the amp, there won't be any conversion anymore. Stereo effects are impossible here, one could put them on afterwards in the box.