Rig Manager on Linux

  • I'm using Rig Manager in a Windows 10 VM using VirtualBox and it works perfectly. The only thing you need to understand is the USB setup to ensure the VM will correctly see when the Kemper is connected.

    1. Install VirtualBox if not already done for your distro.
    2. Download latest MS Win 10 iso.
    3. Install Windows 10 as a guest OS. If you have courage enough to dig into the config mess, stop all stupid useless services...
    4. Install VirtualBox Guest Additions (You can do that from within VirtualBox). It will ease interaction with your host (clipboard, mouse and keyboard capture, desktop dynamic resize...).
    5. Download and install Oracle VirtualBox Extension Pack. It will enable usage of USB 2 and 3 from within VMs. This is basically the crucial step!
    6. Download and install Rig Manager in the VM.

    Once everything is setup starting and stopping the VM takes seconds. Everything works, communication with the Kemper, rig preview, connection to Rig Exchange...


    Of course I nevertheless vote for a native version of Rig Manager for Linux.


    VMs are a pain in the ass in terms of resource consumption, even if for the daily work it does the job and in our case it saves the day. I am using Linux both personally and professionally for years, and there is nothing running a proprietary OS on any of my machines for at least the last 20 years. Running a software as simple a Rig Manager in a MS VM (after all it's only a librarian type software... no tricky video access or big or strange architecture...) can only be a workaround. I have been able to kick out my life those viruses that are Windows or MacOS and voilà, it sneakily comes back for the stupid reason of a proprietary USB driver... This is highly unsatisfactory.


    Mr Kemper, please open source Rig Manager or at least the USB driver. They are freebies and should not disclose any of your IP regarding the Kemper itself. Do it now !

  • I have been able to kick out my life those viruses that are Windows or MacOS and voilà...

    Apart from the "infamous" Flash virus, which required that you grant it permissions and run in order to infiltrate your system, and that Apple quickly patched, I know of nobody who's experienced a Virus on Mac. Norton continued to insist that you should run its malware guards, but I know of nobody who's done so.


    Back in the last days of OS9 the virus count had grown to its peak, which AFAICR was a grand total of 31; Windows had several hundreds of thousands at that time. When OSX dropped, the number fell to zero and has for all but very few users (I've met none) remained there.


    Just sayin'. If avoiding viruses is a primary reason why you're on Linux, you ought to consider OSX IMHO, but of course it's up to you, mate.

  • I stopped using windows ages ago because it was full of viruses and I was formatting my pc every 2 months. I moved to apple which was efficient and stable. Now apple computers are loaded with useless features that disturbes cpus and require yearly updates which are ridiculous scheduled obsolescence. Why would I need itunes to operate a phone? Why would I need this osx version to run that itunes? Oh but my computer is 5 years old and we don’t do updates any more... pure theft

    Now I’m on Linux. The only drawback is that I don’t really understand much but hey, this is better than a painful *ss

  • Apart from the "infamous" Flash virus, which required that you grant it permissions and run in order to infiltrate your system, and that Apple quickly patched, I know of nobody who's experienced a Virus on Mac. Norton continued to insist that you should run its malware guards, but I know of nobody who's done so.

    Ah ah, my idea was not to resume the OS war, because I don't care anymore about that for quite a while now... People use their favorite OS , be it "insert coin to continue" (MacOS), "believe me we are professional" (Windows) or "take my data and run" (ChromeOS). That's their choice... My primary goal in running Linux for more than 20 years on all my machines personal or pro is to know what they are doing, ensure stability, privacy and fight against scheduled obsolescence. I understand this is not a priority for most people...

    So, I'm very sorry you didn't get the joke... To clarify, my sentence meant "Windows and MacOS ARE the viruses", no need to have any third party virus, they come fully loaded;-).

  • LOL Too funny, mate! :D I hear you on all fronts, brother.


    That said, I'm super-grateful that at least I've been able to continue running my 2012 cheese grater as my main machine. I'll need a new graphics card if I want to move to Mojave, but this is the first time I would have been required to make a hardware change to accommodate a new OS, and it's just a cheap graphics card, not a new computer.


    The High Sierra installer flashed 2009-2012 machines (pre nMP trash cans) to 5.1 status if they weren't there already, so even folks on 9 year old computers can still officially run High Sierra, which ain't bad when you think about it. There's actually a freeware patch that'll take 2008 models to 5.1 status, from which point Mojave could be installed along with a new graphics card, so we're looking at 10 years, albeit "unofficial". Mojave will be current for at least a year, bringing the grand total to 11 years. Regardless of OS flavour, most folks these days would run into CPU limitations long before this point, which I think you'd agree renders the forced-obsolescence argument moot, at least thus far. Laptops are a less-inspiring story.


    As I said 'though, I totally hear you, man. More power to you that you've had the balls to have done what you've done. :thumbup:

  • +1 For what it's worth on the Linux development. I've been on (and supporting professionally) Windows since Windows 2.1 in the late 80's. Windows 8 (and to a lesser extent 10) has forced me to stay on Win7 until now - but I was just about to get my first Mac a few months ago when I thought I'd give Linux a go... wow, I haven't looked back. And definitely no pricey Apple gear needed now.

    Rig Manager (and I hope the upcoming Editor) may work in a Virtual Box but its an inconvenience, huge security/privacy risk and added cost (I'll need to buy a Win10 license...)

    I yearn for the day Windows is not seen as the "default" as if nothing else exists...

  • In theory, shouldn‘t be too much of work. I expect them to have enough foresight to have used cross-platform frameworks from the start. Linux should be „easier“ to support than MacOS, they may even use cross-platform compilers.