Which DAW are you using with the Kemper?

  • Reaper here, with mainly 2 plugins :

    - Ample Sound Bass P Lite II : really great because it's free, the sound is great and it offer the ability to import Guitar Pro Tab -> no MIDI programming (it handles all bass articulations according to the Tab)

    - EzDrummer : quite not so expensive (i've seen that slate gives a free light version of SSD5 -> probably a good free alternative)


    Ready to go !

  • If you don't mind the blank faces when folks hear what you use, go for Digital Performer. :D


    I keep hearing about the various DAWs' workflows. Since the dawn of time (the early '80s), Digital Performer hasn't forced a workflow onto you. This is one reason why it had so many mini windows - they weren't all there to be used by every user, or indeed in one flow, but rather, to provide options so that you could map out your own ideal flow, using screen sets to configure your ideal combinations of windows that you'd call up in-sequence(!) on a per-stage basis through a project's development.


    Eventually MOTU introduced the Consolidated Window option, which allows you to configure a single window to incorporate your fave editors and mini-windows in horizontal and vertical panes. As per MOTU's M.O., those who were used to working the "old" way could and still can do so. One of the many things MOTU is good at is not forcing redundancy on you, whether it be compatibility of an old MIDI or Audio interface or the removal of old options in the DAW. That wouldn't be fair on users, after all.


    I'll stop there 'cause all I really wanted to do was chime in and imagine the blank faces once again. Ironic that the oldest sequencer on the Mac (on PC too now), and probably the oldest currently-supported audio software on Mac can elicit so many blank stares. It wasn't this way 20 years ago, I can tell you. Get off my lawn, grasshopper! :pinch::D

  • If you don't mind the blank faces when folks hear what you use, go for Digital Performer.

    I’ve never used it myself but one of my mates does major Hollywood films and high end video game soundtracks. He has been using Performer since the ‘90’s when I was doing Radio Jangles with him. He still swears by it and wouldn’t use anything else. He sends hi projects to his mix engineer in Pro Tools but works in Performer himself.


    i think the best advice is “pick one and stick with it”. Most DAWs can do more than most of us will ever need but trying to learn to work multiple systems takes time and effort that could be used playing and creating.

  • I’ve never used it myself but one of my mates does major Hollywood films and high end video game soundtracks. He has been using Performer since the ‘90’s when I was doing Radio Jangles with him. He still swears by it and wouldn’t use anything else. He sends hi projects to his mix engineer in Pro Tools but works in Performer himself.


    i think the best advice is “pick one and stick with it”. Most DAWs can do more than most of us will ever need but trying to learn to work multiple systems takes time and effort that could be used playing and creating.

    Sage advice, Brother Alan. ;)

  • Reaper here, with mainly 2 plugins :

    - Ample Sound Bass P Lite II : really great because it's free, the sound is great and it offer the ability to import Guitar Pro Tab -> no MIDI programming (it handles all bass articulations according to the Tab)

    - EzDrummer : quite not so expensive (i've seen that slate gives a free light version of SSD5 -> probably a good free alternative)


    Ready to go !

    Good to know about SSD 5. I use & love EZDrummer but always looking for new sounds so I'll give it a try.

  • If you have audio in/out for your iPad Pro, Garageband is all you need. There's no need to spend money on something else until you outgrow Garageband. Try it first and see if it does everything you need it to do.

    HCarlH thanks for the input. I'm going to try the iPad and garage band first just to try it out. Thanks!

    Rik


    Kemper toaster >Kemper remote> 2 x Alto TS310 powered speakers Furman M-8XAR

  • I used to use Reaper years ago, and it's not bad.


    But, I eventually went with FL Studio by Image-Line, which used to be called FruityLoops. It's been around since 1997, and has matured nicely over the years.


    You can download the free trial here: FL Studio downloads.


    The main reasons I went with FL Studio is because, not only is it an excellent DAW, but I really like Image-Line's attitude. You don't feel like you're being ripped-off. If you like the program, then it's just a one time purchase. You just choose which edition you want, and then that's it. After that, all future software updates are free for life. All you have to pay for in the future are add-ons, that's if you require them. A cheaper option is to upgrade to another edition which already has the add-ons included.

  • Well...I must confess that Cool Edit Pro 2.1 it's still in my heart:love:

    I used that a lot many years ago to transfer vinyl albums to digital files. I loved the ease of editing and plugins that reduced the vinyl surface noise.

    The key to everything is patience.
    You get the chicken by hatching the egg, not by smashing it.
    -- Arnold H. Glasow


    If it doesn't produce results, don't do it.

    -- Me

  • I've gotta agree with the users suggesting Reaper. You really can't go wrong with it.


    Its free, and the free version has no limitations compared to other "free" versions of DAWs. You can use Reaper for free for as long as you want, and when you end up wanting to purchase it, it's super affordable (only $65 for a lifetime license)


    Plus, right now Reaper is giving out a free license until July so, you'll have the paid version for the first few months.


    I used to use ProTools, Ableton, and Cakewalk. I prefer Reaper for the customization capabilities, simplicity, and consistency.


    Reaper doesn't crash often in my experience and I can't recall a single time the DAW crashed during heavy in the box work.


    I'd highly recommend it :thumbup:^^